ADVERSE CHILD AND YOUTH ATHLETE EXPERIENCE AND INCREASED ADULT DEATH RATE

So what is the relevance of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, explained below by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to Athlete Safety 1st and Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, which are primary concerns of this website?

It’s simple. Our 1962 Kentucky Football Story was not a series of random events, but a story about Premeditated torture and abuse. We suffered an absurd, unexpected, nasty and confusing challenge to our established football knowledge and beliefs.

Most of us 1962 UK Football Athletes have “experienced a psychological force pushing back, trying to re-assert the things that we feel were “ethical, reasonable and familiar about football.”

The significance of our story is that lessons must be learned from our tragedy and conveyed to the appropriate ears for action. Most importantly, lessons must be learned to prevent the same tragic stories for children. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) must be prevented. Possibly crystal clear public policy concerning CAAS might “trickle-up”.

Our 1962 Kentucky Football Abuse Survey revealed that the death rate calculated appeared to be significantly higher among Kentucky Football Athletes, who stayed and played for abusive Kentucky Head Coach Charlie Bradshaw, after UK Head Coach Blanton Collier was fired January 1962, compared to those who didn’t stay and play at UK and “pulled out” for other schools, transferred to other football programs and/or continued academic interests rather than football careers.

• ~ 14 %, 1 of every 69 pro-football players born during the 50 years from about 1960 to 2010 years, were deceased by 2010 [By Thomas Hargrove | Scripps Howard News Service, ESPN, Jan 31, 2006]
• 11.4 % of the last team recruited by Coach Blanton Collier were deceased by 2010 = 12 / 105 players. 6 Upperclassmen and 6 freshmen from the fall of 1961 UK football team.
• 27 % of The Thin Thirty Kentucky football Athletes, who did stayed at UK and played for abusive Head Coach Bradshaw in 1962 were deceased by 2010 or = 8 / 30
• 10.5 % of the “Pull Out” 1961 UK freshmen recruited by Coach Blanton Collier, who did not stay at UK and play for abusive Bradshaw, were deceased by year 2010 = 4 / 38
• 1962 Kentucky Football Abuse survey revealed that The Thin Thirty Kentucky Football Athletes, who stayed with abusive Head Coach Charlie Bradshaw and played the 1962 UK football season, estimated:
• Had nearly twice (2X) the death rate compared to pro-football Athletes in the 50 years prior to the year 2010 or 27% (UK) vs 14% (Pro-football)
• Had about 2.4 times (2.4X) the death rate compared to the last team recruited by Coach Blanton Collier
• Had about 2.6 times (2.6X) the death rate compared to “Pull Out” players from Coach Blanton Collier’s 1961 UK Freshmen team, who did not stay at UK and play for abusive Bradshaw.

Remember, “pulling out” of corrupt, abusive Sports Recreation and Exercise (SRE) programs is not “quitting”, because “pulling out” might save a Child or Youth Athlete’s life. Forget that ole “quitting hogwash” and playing out of fear of the Coach, Parents or other irrational, abusive caretaker nonsense. It’s about Child and Youth Athlete Safety 1st, period.

[Longitudinal and Retrospective Study of The Impact of Coaching Behaviors on the 1961-1962 University of Kentucky Football Wildcats by Kay Collier McLaughlin, Ph.D., Micheal B. Minix Sr. M.D., Twila Minix, R.N., Jim Overman, Scott Brogdon See cappaa.com]
[See on this website: http://www.cappaa.com/category/1962-kentucky-football-abuse]

“It may not be apparent unless one works in the field, but abuse of athlete children in the name of their sports is relatively widespread, even in so-called civilized societies.”[Br J Sports Med 2007;41:59-60]

This is one cruel example: Jerry Sandusky, the Penn State Football Coach, was found guilty on 45 of the 48 charges for Child Molestation June 22, 2012, a terrible tragedy. He is now in prison. Many other predators roam free.

“The experience of events or conditions that cause inordinate stress to the maturing brain (and the associated neurological, immune-response, and hormone systems) can negatively affect development in childhood. Although stress exists on a continuum, and varies across individuals, situations, and ages, certain life experiences are typically accompanied by levels of biological stress that research has shown can be “toxic.” Human growth, development and longevity can be arrested and death can ensue.

[1]Middlebrooks, J. S. & Audage, N.C. (2008). The effects of childhood stress on health across the lifespan. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.
[2]Anda, R. F., Felitti, V. J., Bremmer, J. D., Walker, J. D., Whitfield, C., Perry, B. D., Dube, S. R., & Giles, W. H. (2006). The enduring effects of abuse and related adverse experiences in childhood. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 256, 174-186. – See more at: http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=adverse-experiences#sthash.TWaG1Hcu.dpuf
[3]Child Trends. (2013). Adverse experiences. Available at: http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=adverse-experiences – See more at: http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=adverse-experiences#sthash.TWaG1Hcu.dpuf

The conclusion below in the ACE Study stated, “We found a strong graded relationship between the breadth of exposure to abuse or household dysfunction during childhood and multiple risk factors for several of the leading causes of death in adults.”

Recurrent, continuous, chronic, Adverse Child and Youth Athlete Experiences and any other Child and Youth Adverse Experiences in other venues are potentially problematic causes of increased death rate in adulthood.

Our 1961-1962 Kentucky Wildcat Football study revealed that recurrent, continuous, chronic physical and psychological football abuse, Adverse Youth Athlete Experiences during the UK Coach Charlie Bradshaw era:
• Caused Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, which was the wheelhouse for stored Youth Athlete Adverse Experiences from Physical and Psychological Abuse (and is the same for sexual abuse and other human rights violations which were not our circumstances).
• That eventually affected a wide range of adult complex health risk interactions
• Resulting in abnormal behaviors, diseases and pathologies,
• That became clinically manifest Post Traumatic Stress Disorders in adulthood with shortened life spans and increased death rates.
[Longitudinal and Retrospective Study of The Impact of Coaching Behaviors on the 1961-1962 University of Kentucky Football Wildcats by Kay Collier McLaughlin, Ph.D., Micheal B. Minix Sr. M.D., Twila Minix, R.N., Jim Overman, Scott Brogdon See cappaa.com]

______________________________________________________________________________

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study-CDC

“The ACE Study findings suggest that certain experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. Progress in preventing and recovering from the nation’s worst health and social problems is likely to benefit from understanding that many of these problems arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences.

Learn About the ACE Study

“The initial phase of the ACE Study was conducted at Kaiser Permanente from 1995 to 1997. More than 17,000 participants completed a standardized physical examination. No further participants will be enrolled, but we are tracking the medical status of the baseline participants

[Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 – Contact CDC–INFO]

“Conclusions: We found a strong graded relationship between the breadth of exposure to abuse or household dysfunction during childhood and multiple risk factors for several of the leading causes of death in adults.

“Childhood Abuse:
Psychological 898 — 52a 47 51 50 39 9 93 74
Physical abuse 874 54 — 44 45 38 35 9 86 64
Sexual abuse 1770 24 22 — 39 31 23 6 65 41

“Household dysfunction:
Substance abuse 2064 22 19 34 — 34 29 8 69 40
Mental illness 1512 30 22 37 46 — 26 7 74 47
Mother treated violently 1010 34 31 41 59 38 — 10 86 62
Member imprisoned 271 29 29 40 62 42 37 — 86 64
median 29.5 25.4 40.5 48.5 38 32 8.5 80 54.5
range (22–54) (19–52) (34–47) (39–62) (31–50) (23–39) (6–10) (65–93) (40–74)

“For example, among persons who were psychologically abused, 52% were also physically abused. More persons were a second category than would be expected by chance (P < .001; chi-square). "The number of categories of childhood exposures by demographic characteristics is shown in Table 3. Statistically, significantly fewer categories of exposure were found among older persons, white or Asian persons, and college graduates P < .001). Because age is associated with both the childhood exposures as well as many of the health risk factors and disease outcomes, all prevalence estimates in the tables are adjusted for "We found a strong dose response relationship between the breadth of exposure to abuse or household dysfunction during childhood and multiple risk factors for several of the leading causes of death in adults. Disease conditions including ischemic heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, skeletal fractures, and liver disease, as well as poor self-rated health also showed a graded relationship to the breadth of childhood exposures. The findings suggest that the impact of these adverse childhood experiences on adult health status is strong and cumulative. "The clear majority of patients in our study who were exposed to one category of childhood abuse or household dysfunction were also exposed to at least one other. Therefore, researchers trying to understand the long-term health implications of childhood abuse may benefit from considering a wide range of related adverse childhood exposures. Certain adult health outcomes may be more strongly related to unique combinations or the intensity of adverse childhood exposures than to the total breadth of exposure that we used for our analysis. However, the analysis we present illustrates the need for an overview of the net effects of a group of complex interactions on a wide range of health risk behaviors and diseases. [“The Relationship of Adult Health Status to Childhood Abuse and Household Dysfunction ,” published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine in 1998, Volume 14, pages 245–258]] ______________________________________________________________________________

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *