BASKETBALL SOLD ITS SOUL AND FINESSE TO ROUGH-AND-TUMBLE WAY-TO-PLAY

BASKETBALL SOLD ITS SOUL AND FINESSE TO ROUGH-AND-TUMBLE WAY-TO-PLAY

• U.S. Basketball has traded finesse i.e. excellent free throw and field goal percentages, few turnovers, many assists, basketball IQ etc.
• for physical basketball i.e. selling the soul and basketball finesse to rough-and-tumble way-to-play i.e. weight lifting, banging, rough-and-tumble, concussions, severe injuries, danger.
• possibly from international game-ways-for-play
• Treatment for Concussion and Catastrophic Sports Injuries have improved, HOORAY
• because CATASTROPHIC SPORTS INJURIES ARE INCREASING, BOO
• Physical Disabilities, unemployment and underemployment have increased from old sports injuries
• For the 30 year period from Fall 1982 through the Spring of 2012 there were 2,061 catastrophic sports-related injuries and illnesses at the high school and college level. Basketball (28.6%) accounted for the greatest proportion of direct injuries at the college level. Basketball accounted for the greatest proportion of indirect catastrophic injuries at both the high school (76.2%) and college levels (68.2%). [Catastrophic Sports Injury Research 13th Annual Report, Fall 1982 to 2012, Frederick O. Mueller, Ph.D. Kristen L. Kucera, MSPH, Ph.D., ATC Leah M. Cox, MS, CRC, LRT/CTRS University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Robert C. Cantu, M.D. Emerson Hospital Concord, MA 01742]
• [Poor free-throw shooting fouling up basketball, by Billy Reed: January 17th, 2014 Louisville Catholic Sports]
• [Rough-and-tumble 11th Region produces several concussions Mike Fields, Herald Leader, January 22, 2015]

“Water polo, football, and basketball had the highest indirect catastrophic injury rate at the high school level.At the college level, basketball, skiing, football, water polo, and ice hockey had the highest rate of indirect catastrophic injury

“College winter sports were associated with three indirect catastrophic injuries during the 2011-2012 school year (Tables XIII – XVI). All occurred in basketball—two injuries were fatal and one was non-fatal.

“A summary of high school winter sports, 1982-1983 – 2011-2012, shows a total of 141 direct catastrophic injuries (nine fatalities, 76 non-fatal, and 56 serious) and 185 indirect (175 fatalities, one disability, and nine serious). Wrestling was associated with 63 or 44.6% of the direct injuries. Gymnastics and swimming were associated with 13 (9.2%) of the direct injuries. Basketball was associated with 22 (15.6%), ice hockey was associated with 29 (20.5%), and volleyball one (0.70%). Basketball accounted for the greatest number of indirect catastrophic injuries with 141 (76.2%) of the winter total.

“College winter sports from 1982-1983 – 2011-2012 were associated with a total of 35 direct catastrophic injuries. The majority of these events were in ice hockey with 13 (37.1%),
basketball with ten (28.6%) followed by gymnastics with seven (20.0%), skiing and wrestling each with two (5.7%), and swimming with one (2.9%). There were also 63 indirect injuries (56 fatalities) during this time period. The majority were associated with basketball (n=43, 68.2%), followed by nine in swimming (14.2%), four in wrestling (6.3%), three in ice hockey (4.7%), and two in volleyball (3.1%), and one each for skiing and gymnastics (1.5%).

“High school wrestling accounted for the greatest number of winter sport direct injuries, but the injury rate per 100,000 participants was less than one for all three categories. High school wrestling has averaged approximately 244,000 male and 2,470 female participants each year. High school basketball and swimming were also associated with low direct injury rates.

‘Indirect high school catastrophic injury rates, as indicated in Table XII, are all below one per 100,000 participants, with men’s basketball having the highest fatality rate (0.47)

“Injury rates for male college indirect fatalities were also high when compared to the highschool rates. Basketball had an injury rate of 7.66 fatalities per 100,000 male participants, skiing 5.30, ice hockey 0.87, and swimming 2.82. The year 1997-98 was the first year there were anyindirect fatalities in wrestling. These three deaths were due to heat stroke associated with wrestlers trying to make weight for a match. The indirect injury rate for wrestling was 1.98 per 100,000 participants.

“The female indirect injury rate for basketball was 1.53 per 100,000 participants, 0.77 for volleyball, 0.72 for swimming and 2.24 for gymnastics.

“There have been a total of 131 direct and 62 indirect catastrophic injuries to high school female athletes from 1982-83 – 2011-2012, which includes cheerleading. College females
accounted for 52 direct and 16 indirect catastrophic injuries (including cheerleading) for the same time period. The 131 high school direct injuries included four deaths, 56 disability, and 71 serious injuries. Stratified by sport, the greatest number of high school direct injuries were in cheerleading (over half at 63.3%), followed by gymnastics, track and field, softball, swimming, and basketball (Table 2). Of the 62 high school indirect catastrophic injuries, basketball had the
highest number followed by cheerleading, swimming, cross country, track and field, soccer, and volleyball (Table 3). Over half of the 52 college direct injuries were associated with cheerleading, followed by gymnastics, field hockey, skiing, and lacrosse (Table 4). Roughly one 28 third of the 16 college indirect injuries were from basketball followed by soccer, swimming, and volleyball (Table 5).

“RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PREVENTION
1. Mandatory medical examinations and a thorough medical history should be taken before allowing an athlete to participate.
2. All personnel concerned with training athletes should emphasize proper and appropriate physical conditioning in order to prepare the athlete for the rigors of the sport.
3. Every school should strive to have a certified athletic trainer, who is a regular member of the faculty, and is adequately prepared and qualified.
4. There should be a written emergency procedure plan to deal with the possibility of a catastrophic injury.
5. There should be an emphasis on employing well trained athletic personnel, providing excellent facilities and securing the safest and best equipment available.
6. There should be strict enforcement of game rules and administrative regulations to protect the health of the athlete and reduce the risk of catastrophic injury. Coaches and school officials must support the game officials in their rulings during the sporting event.
7. Coaches should be educated on and have the ability to teach the proper fundamental skills of the specific sport. Specific to football, the proper fundamentals of blocking and tackling should be emphasized to help reduce head and neck injuries, especially with keeping the head out of blocking and tackling.
8. Coaches should have the training and experience needed to teach the skills of the sport and to properly train and develop the athletes for competition.
9. Weight loss in wrestling to make weight for a match can be dangerous and cause serious injury or death. Coaches should be aware of safety precautions and rules associated with this practice.

[Catastrophic Sports Injury Research 13th Annual Report, Fall 1982 to 2012, Frederick O. Mueller, Ph.D. Kristen L. Kucera, MSPH, Ph.D., ATC Leah M. Cox, MS, CRC, LRT/CTRS University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Robert C. Cantu, M.D. Emerson Hospital Concord, MA 01742]

http://nccsir.unc.edu/files/2014/06/NCCSIR-30th-Annual-All-Sport-Report-1982_2012.pdf