CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION (CME) DOCTOR CATEGORY II (2)

DOCTORS CME Category 2 / II IS free on this ATHLETE SAFETY 1ST, CAPPAA WEB SITE which does not authorize and has no advertising, fund raising, donations, campaings or contributions.

Facts – CME Regulation 201 KAR 9:310, Kentucky Statutes. All States are similar.

“What is Continuing Medical Education?”

“Continuing Medical Education consists of educational activities, which serve to maintain, develop, or increase the knowledge, skills, and professional performance, and relationships that a physician uses to provide services for patients, the public, or the profession. The content of CME is that body of knowledge and skills generally recognized and accepted by the profession as within the basic medical sciences, the discipline of clinical medicine, and the provision of health care to the public.”

“What are the CME requirements?”

“In accordance with Board regulation 201 KAR 9:310, as of January 1, 1994, all physicians who maintain an active Kentucky medical or osteopathic license are required to complete 60 hours of CME every three years, with 30 hours being certified in AMA Category 1 by an organization accredited by the Accreditation Council on Continuing Medical Education. Of the remaining 30 hours, a minimum of two hours of the required CME must be acquired in HIV/AIDS courses approved by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services pursuant to 902 KAR 2:160 every ten year period. The HIV/AIDS course certificate must be dated no earlier than January 1, 2000 to qualify for the ten year period. Click here for information on a Kentucky approved HIV/AIDS education course.”

“Are there other means of fulfilling this requirement?”

“In lieu of the 60-hour requirement, the Board will accept the following:”

“American Medical Association’s “Physician Recognition Award” or the American Osteopathic Association’s “Osteopathic PhysicianRecognition Award”, provided that such certification is effective at the time a license is renewed. Verification that the licensee has completed CME requirements of any specialty organization, which is recognized by the American Medical Association or the American Osteopathic Association, which is at least equivalent to their recognized awards and that such certification is in effect at the time the license is renewed. Verification that a licensee is in or has been in an accredited postgraduate training program during the three-year cycle. Each year of postgraduate training is equivalent to 50 hours of CME.”

“What are Category 1 CME activities?”

“AMA Category 1 CME activities must be designated by an accredited sponsor and must meet the following requirements:”

“Be sponsored by an organization accredited for continuing medical education by one of the state medical associations or by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACGME)”

“Be designated as AMA Category 1 education by that organization
What are some of the other CME Activities?”

“Medscape’s continuing education activities currently offer various types of credit, including AMA/PRA Category 1 credit for MDs/DOs,”
Reference: http://www.medscape.com/public/help/cme

CATEGORY 2 CME CREDIT, PREVENT CHILD ATHLETE ABUSE AMERICA

Study of ATHLETE SAFETY 1ST CAPPAA Web Site Offers Doctors Potential Category II / 2 CME Credit Counting Toward American Medical Association Physician Recognition Award and State License

Study of CAPPAA Web Site Offers Doctors Category II CME Credit Counting Toward American Medical Association Physician Recognition Award and State License. In each case, the physician individually determines the educational value of Category II activities in which he or she participates and the hours of participation for credit.

American Medical Association Physician’s Recognition Award™ and State License Category II CME Credit Claim Form Follows.

Fill in the blanks and print this document for your records to support your CME claim.

Definition of AMA PRA Category II CME Credit:

AMA PRA™ Category II Credit is defined as all educational activities not designated for Category 1 that: comply with the AMA definition of CME; comply with the AMA ethical opinions on Gifts to Physicians from Industry and on Ethical Issues in CME (i.e., are not promotional); and a physician finds to be a worthwhile learning experience related to his/her practice. Accredited providers do not designate activities for AMA PRA™ Category 2 Credit.

Physicians may claim AMA PRA™ Category 2 Credit for such learning activities as: teaching residents, medical students or other health professionals; unstructured online searching and learning (i.e., not Internet Point of Care); reading authoritative medical literature; or participating in live activities not designated for AMA PRA™ Category 1 Credit.

Other examples include:
• Consultation with peers and medical experts
• Small group discussions
• Self assessment activities
• Medical writing
• Preceptorships
• Research

In each case, the physician individually determines the educational value of those AMA PRA™ Category 2 activities in which he or she participates.

Documentation: self documented; physicians should self claim credit for appropriate AMA PRA™ Category 2 activities on their AMA PRA™ certificate application form. Credit assignment: as with live activities, physicians may self claim one (1) AMA PRA™ Category 2 Credit for each 60-minute hour engaged in the learning activity.

Physicians may claim credit in 15 minute, or 0.25 credit increments, and round to the nearest quarter hour.

Complete the following questions for AMA PRA™ and State License Category 2 Credit

Type of Activity:
Study of Child and Adult Physical, Psychological and Sexual Athlete Abuse and the 10 B’s of Child Abuse in general
Internet web site – http://www.cappaa.com/
Date of Activity___________________________________
Range of Activity_______________________________
Number of Category 2 Credits Claimed______________

—————————————————-
Physician Signature

Category 2 credits are self-documented. Please keep this form in your personal CME file as record of your attendance and credits claimed.

___Kentucky State Statute for CME and Medical Licensure _____

Facts – CME Regulation 201 KAR 9:310 What is Continuing Medical Education?

Continuing Medical Education consists of educational activities, which serve to maintain, develop, or increase the knowledge, skills, and professional performance, and relationships that a physician uses to provide services for patients, the public, or the profession. The content of CME is that body of knowledge and skills generally recognized and accepted by the profession as within the basic medical sciences, the discipline of clinical medicine, and the provision of health care to the public.

What are the CME requirements?

In accordance with Board regulation 201 KAR 9:310, as of January 1, 1994, all physicians who maintain an active Kentucky medical or osteopathic license are required to complete 60 hours of CME every three years, with 30 hours being certified in AMA Category 1 by an organization accredited by the Accreditation Council on Continuing Medical Education. Of the remaining 30 hours, a minimum of two hours of the required CME must be acquired in HIV/AIDS courses approved by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services pursuant to 902 KAR 2:160 every ten year period. The HIV/AIDS course certificate must be dated no earlier than January 1, 2000 to qualify for the ten year period.

Are there other means of fulfilling this requirement?

In lieu of the 60-hour requirement, the Board will accept the following:

American Medical Association’s “Physician Recognition Award” or the American Osteopathic Association’s “Osteopathic Physician Recognition Award”, provided that such certification is effective at the time a license is renewed.

Verification that the licensee has completed CME requirements of any specialty organization, which is recognized by the American Medical Association or the American Osteopathic Association, which is at least equivalent to their recognized awards and that such certification is in effect at the time the license is renewed.
Verification that a licensee is in or has been in an accredited postgraduate training program during the three-year cycle. Each year of postgraduate training is equivalent to 50 hours of CME.

What are Category 1 CME activities?

AMA Category 1 CME activities must be designated by an accredited sponsor and must meet the following requirements:

Be sponsored by an organization accredited for continuing medical education by one of the state medical associations or by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACGME)
Be designated as AMA Category 1 education by that organization
What are some of the other CME Activities?

The remaining hours may consist of non‑supervised personal learning activities. They can include self‑instruction, audio‑visual materials, television and radio broadcasts, programmed medical education materials, consultation, use of databases and other computer‑based materials, patient care review, self‑assessment, teaching, articles, publications, books, exhibits and CME lectures and seminars.

How will CME credits be collected?

At the end of each three-year cycle you will be sent a form along with your annual renewal licensure application asking if you have completed your CME requirements. The current cycle is January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008. After April 1, 2006, you may be required to provide satisfactory evidence that in the preceding three years you have attained the required CME certification. The Board will provide a form to be filled out by physicians who through a random search will be audited and at that time those chosen for audit by the Board will be expected to produce evidence of completing the necessary requirements. It is important that you have documentation on hand to provide if audited. Please do not send documentation to the Board unless requested.

Is there an extension of time?

The Board may grant an extension of time to a physician who for sufficient cause has not yet received CME certification. At the end of a designated CME cycle a physician must request an extension by April 1st following the three year CME cycle. The fee to request an extension is $100. The licensee who fails to timely complete the CME requirement or who fails to obtain an extension of time shall be fined a minimum of $200.00 and given six months to come into compliance. After the six-month period, should the licensee still not be in compliance, his or her license shall be immediately suspended until such time as verifiable evidence is submitted indicating completion of the CME requirement. Under no circumstances will waivers be granted from this requirement.

Do physicians who are retired have to comply?

Yes, there are no provisions for retired physicians who maintain an active license in the Commonwealth. All physicians holding a current Kentucky license are require to complete the 60 hours of CME during each three year cycle.

Who should I contact if I have a question?

If you should require additional information concerning Category approval please contact the Kentucky Medical Association’s CME Department, 4965 US Highway 42, Suite 2000, Louisville, Kentucky 40222, (502) 426‑6200 or the Division of Continuing Medical Education, American Medical Association, 515 N State Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610, (312) 464‑4672. For a list of HIV/AIDS approved courses, please contact the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, 275 E. Main Street, Frankfort, Kentucky 40621, (502) 564-6539. Other inquires may be submitted to the Board’s office at (502) 429-7150.

The State of Kentucky provides a folder to Physicians. The following is part of the folder for keeping CME credits:

RETAIN THIS FOLDER TO RECORD ACTIVITIES AND TO HOLD CME PROGRAMS, NOTES, RECEIPTS
Continuing Medical Education Rules Information
All requests for complete copies of the CME rules for Kentucky licensees and additional information should be direct in writing to:
Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure
310 Whittington Parkway, Suite 1B
Louisville, KY 40222
502.429.7150
The Board may deny a request for approval of activities for CME credit whenever it appears that the request fails to demonstrate compliance with the legislative intent to further educate licensees on subjects related to the practice of medicine.
Summary of CME Credit
2009 2010 2011
Category 1 ____ ____ ____
Category 2 ____ ____ ____
TOTALS ____ ____ ____

Contributing author and researcher for CAPPAA website:
MICHEAL B. MINIX SR., M.D.

Curriculum Vitae and Work and Sports History
Business Mailing Address – P.O. Box 910725, Lexington Kentucky, 40591

Education:
•Graduate, Paintsville High School, Kentucky, 1961
•Attended the University of Kentucky 1961-1964
•Admitted to the University of Kentucky College of Medicine after 3 years undergraduate study in 1964
•Graduate University of Kentucky College of Medicine 1968
•Graduate Rotating General Practice Internship, Memorial Hospital, Savannah, GA, 1969
•Graduate Ophthalmology Residency, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, 1974 that included successfully completing the Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, Basic Science Course in Ophthalmology
•C.A.R.E. (Child Abuse Recognition Education) certified to teach other physicians and their office staff in their office about the recognition of Child Abuse

Medical Practice:
•General Practice in Medicine, Prestonsburg, KY, 1969-1971 Emergency Room Medicine – Prestonsburg General Hospital and Highlands Regional Medical Center 1969-1974
•Ophthalmology practice – Ashland, Paintsville, Prestonsburg, Kentucky 1974-1998
•Board Certified American Board of Ophthalmology
•U.S. Army Reserve Medical Corp, 810 Hospital Unit, 1972-1978
•Ophthalmology, Commission for Handicapped Children Ashland, Kentucky

Past Medical Volunteer:
•Mudd Creek Clinic, Floyd County, Kentucky
•Nathaniel Methodist Mission, Lexington Kentucky
•Volunteer for Pre-participation Sports Participation Physicals Exams Paintsville, Ashland, Lexington, KY

Retired From Active Membership:
•Kentucky Medical Association
•American Medical Association
•Pan American Association of Ophthalmology
•American Academy of Ophthalmology
•Kentucky Eye Physicians and Surgeons
•F.I.C.S., Fellow International College of Surgeons

Current Member or Participation:
•Fellow University of Kentucky
•Lifetime University of Kentucky Alumni Association
•Class Representative, Board of Directors University of Kentucky Medical Alumni Association
•CAPPAA, Child and Adult Physical, Psychological and Sexual Athlete Abuse
•Prevent Child Athlete Abuse America
•Prevent Child Athlete Abuse Kentucky

Current Research:
•Prevent Athlete Injury
•Youth Sports Safety Act
•Child and Adult Physical and Psychological (Emotional) Athlete Endangerment that Results in Serious Athlete Injury and Abuse and Athlete Sexual Abuse
•University of Kentucky Football Abuse Study
•Child Abuse
•Exercise to Exhaustion
•Immune Response During and After Exercise to Exhaustion

Consultant:
•National Cheer Safety Foundation

Testimony:
•Testified before the House Education Committee for House Bill 383 as requested by Rep Joni Jenkins, Louisville

Athletic History:
•Honorable mention Courier Journal All State Football 1958
•3rd team Courier Journal All State Football 1959
•1st team Courier Journal All State Football 1960
•Record 20 high school letters in Football, Baseball, Basketball, Track at Paintsville High School
•Leading Scorer in the nation 618 points and 103 touchdowns at end of high school career 1960
•High School All American Football 1960
•All American Football Classic game Ft. Lauderdale, FL 1961
•Most Valuable player, Frank Lehey Award Offense MVP, All
American Football Classic, 1961 Ft. Lauderdale, FL
•Declined Professional baseball contracts June 1961 for
College Football. The Professional draft began 2 years later, 1963
•Football Grant in Aid (Scholarship) University of Kentucky 1961 under Head Coach Blanton Collier
•Pulled Out from Athlete Abusive Football Program under Head Coach Charlie Bradshaw University of Kentucky 1962
•Johnson County Centennial Sports Hall of Fame
•Dawahare’s Kentucky High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame

Past Coaching and Athletic Administrative Experience:
•Coach and Manager Paintsville Little League Baseball
•Coach Ashland Little League Baseball
•Coach Junior Football League Ashland
•Coach Paintsville Middle School Football
•Coach Hager Middle School Basketball Ashland
•Coach Ashland Babe Ruth League
•Coach Paintsville Babe Ruth League
•Coach Lexington Babe Ruth League
•President, Johnson County Babe Ruth League
•Board of Directors, Paintsville Yankees Baseball Minor League Team A Class A minor league team owned by the New York Yankees
•Team Physician, Paintsville High School Football and Basketball
________________________________________________________________________

Sports accidents happen while playing by the rules in safe sports environments with proper coaching supervision and conduct. Those Injuries and Deaths are Accidental and Not Preventable.

But direct or indirect Physical and Psychological (Emotional) Maltreatment and Endangerment and Sexual Abuse of a Child and Youth Athlete by a Coach resulting in Serious Injury and/or Death is Unlawful. These incidents are Preventable, Non-Accidental and Not Natural to the Game Being Played by the Athlete

The present day Epidemic of Sports Injuries behoves Coaches to Protect themselves with improved Education, Awareness and Understanding because, not only are they Unlawful, but Doctors are required by law to report these suspected Unflawful Incidents to authorties i.e. the County Attorney and Child Protective Services (CPS).

The children in the video on the right of this page are suffering from neglect, physical, psychological, and sexual abuse that occur in the home and usually family setting.

Fortunately, this child abuse venue or setting have been identified and recognized. Advocating for these victims through awareness campaigns and education has lessened their victimization, although not nearly enough.

On the other hand, Athlete Physical, Psychological Maltreatment, Endangerment and Sexual Abuse have gone unrecognized and have been under reported. Preventable, Non-Accidental Sports Related Injuries that are Not Natural to the Games Being Played, are increasing at an alarming rate.

Athlete Safety 1st is our Motto. CAPPAA is Child and Adult Physical and Psychological [Emotional] Athlete Abuse.

In our society, parents, guardians, baby-sitters, protective, supervising Coaches, who have a professional duty whether they are compensated or not, and other designated caregivers and supervisors are expected to protect children, youth and adults from harmful people or situations.

In Kentucky, KRS 620-645 and 209 provide protection for children, youth and adults who may be suffering from abuse by a supervisor or caregiver.

The International Criminal Court has jurisdiction over Youth International Athletes.

Doctors are the most important hands-on immediate advocates for Athletes. Doctors can intervene for an athlete instantly for Athlete Safety. Doctors are the Eyes and Ears of Child and Youth Athlete Welfare.

The Kentucky Department for Community Based Services [DCBS] “provides family support; child care; child and adult protection, improve safety and permanency for children and vulnerable adults;” Recently in Kentucky, The Child Safety Branch of DCBS responded to the question regarding coaches as caregivers. Their answer and policy follows:

“Our agency [DCBS] investigates abuse and neglect allegations involving situations where a person is providing care, has custody or has control of a child. Teachers, camp counselors, bus drivers, babysitters, grandparents, coaches etc fit in to that category if they are left to care for a child and the parent is not present for supervision. We are investigating these type situations in this manner across the state. If [DCBS] staff have questions about whether a person falls into these categories, they can consult with Central Office or their regional attorney.”

The definition from the Government’s Guidance on Adult Abuse: “a person aged 18 years or over….who is unable to protect him or herself against significant harm or exploitation”.

However, there is a Fiduciary Trust of Relationship of the College/University Coach and their Athlete. The Coach is charged with scrupulous, honorable, conscientious, trustworthy Protection of the Youth Athlete.

Doctors who fail to Report Serious Injuries and/or Death that result from Child Maltreatment, Endangerment and Abuse of any kind, are subject to charges of Failure to Report and possible malpractice claims.

“Mandatory reporting and screening laws are proliferating, and emergency physicians must be aware of the laws or risk criminal charges and malpractice claims. Most laws specifically provide physician immunity with respect to breaches of confidentiality whenever reports are made in good faith. These laws reflect a societal need to identify and intervene on both the medical and legal aspects of certain problems such as child abuse. The coroner, departments of health and social services, law enforcement, and the medical board, are some of the authorities to which emergency physicians are required to report. Everyday emergency practice requires awareness and compliance with myriad reporting laws.” 64. Mandatory Reporting Laws and the Emergency Department. Forensic Emergency Medicine, Part Ii Topics in Emergency Medicine. 21(3):63-72, September 1999. Mallon, William K. MD, FACEP, FAAEM; Kassinove, Andrew JD, MD

The Kentucky Unified Juvenile Code (All States have similar codes.)

“The child protection program is mandated by statute, which means there are state laws which declare a child’s right to be free from abuse and neglect. These laws are called the Kentucky Unified Juvenile Code and are contained in KRS Chapters 600 to 645.”

“The Code requires the reporting of neglect, physical, sexual or emotional abuse, and dependency of children whether it occurs in the home, the school or other community settings. It requires that these reports will be assessed and investigated, and requires that social services will be provided to children found to be experiencing maltreatment.”

“Inherent in the Code are two basic principles: a child’s fundamental right to be safe and to be nurtured; and a child’s basic right to be raised by his/her own parents, whenever possible.” Violations of KUJC are referred to a speciality court, the Juvenile Court.

Juvenile Court (District Court)

Juvenile Court is a division of District Court. Cases involving children under the age of 18 are handled in Juvenile Court. Cases filed in Juvenile Court include dependency; neglect and abuse; and other juvenile matters. In jurisdictions where there is a Family Court division of Circuit Court, the Family Court will hear matters of dependent, neglected and/or abused children, as well as status offenses when no public offense is pending. All other juvenile matters remain within the jurisdiction of Juvenile (District) Court.

Unlike other District Court and Circuit Court hearings, which are open to the public, Juvenile Court hearings are closed to the public. The trial of Coach Jason Stinson was held in Jefferson Circuit Court, not a specialty Juvenile Court.

620.120 Criminal charges tried separately. In cases where criminal charges arising out of the same transaction or occurrence are filed against an adult alleged to be the perpetrator of child abuse or neglect, such charges shall be tried separately from the adjudicatory hearing held pursuant to this chapter. Effective: July 1, 1987History:Created 1986 Ky. Acts ch.423,sec. 73, effective July 1, 1987

USA Today – Jan 23, 2009 – LOUISVILLE — The head football coach of Pleasure Ridge Park High School has been charged with Reckless Homicide in the death of a 15-year-old player who collapsed from heat stroke at practice. (Exertional Heat Stroke)

Oct. 11, 2008.- Lexington Herald Leader- The caretaker of a child found dead in a hot car, reportedly left inside for about 9 hours, was charged with reckless homicide. (Non-Exertional Heat Stroke)

Aug. 12, 2009 – WHAS 11 – Max Gilpin’s Coach Stinson was charged additionally with Wanton Endangerment. But the judge dismissed the charge for lack of defense testimony.

8/18/2009, 3:18 p.m. CDT The Associated Press (AP) — LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A grand jury has re-indicted a former Kentucky high school football coach on an additional charge in the case of a player who collapsed at practice and later died.

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) – Judge orders charges against Stinson consolidated – Posted: Aug 20, 2009 12:53 PM EDT – In a ruling released Thursday morning, Jefferson Circuit Judge Susan Schultz Gibson has ruled that charges brought by a grand jury against Jason Stinson will be heard during the same trial. Stinson, the former head football coach at Pleasure Ridge Park High School, is facing reckless homicide and wanton endangerment charges for the death of player Max Gilpin.

USA Today- Jan 23, 2008 – LOUISVILLE -Dr. Frederick Mueller, director of the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at University of North Carolina, was among several sports experts who said Thursday they had never heard of a high school or college coach facing such an indictment.

Mueller said the indictment of Stinson will be “an eye opener” for coaches who deny water to players.

After a short deliberation on Sept. 17, 2009 the jury acquitted Coach Jason Stinson of all charges brought against him in the death Max Gilpin, the Louisville PRP High School football player.

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