SAVE CHILD ATHLETES FROM CRUELTY AND ABUSE: STOP COACHES, PARENTS AND DOCTORS FROM CROSSING THE LINE

IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR THE COACH SUPERVISOR AKA CARETAKER TO HAVE SEXUAL CONTACT WITH CHILD AND YOUTH ATHLETES AND UNLAWFUL TO BE CRUEL, PHYSICALLY AND PSYCHOLOGICALLY ENDANGER, MALTREAT AND VIOLATE THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF CHILD AND YOUTH ATHLETES

Coach is a very particular Supervisor, Temporary Substitute Caretaker label that requires that the Coach, in the Child-Athlete-Coach relationship, implement complete Child (<18) Athlete Protection, Care and Safety in the absence of the Permanent Caretaker, Parent or Guardian. According to CAPTA 2010, Federal Public Law 111-320, it is illegal for a Supervisor, aka Permanent Caretaker and Temporary Substitute Caretaker, to have sexual contact with minor children, less than 18, whom the Coach is supervising and for whom the Coach is providing care. CAPTA 2010 includes that it is also illegal for a Supervisor, aka Permanent Caretaker and Temporary Substitute Caretaker, to physically and emotionally (psychologically) endanger, maltreat or abuse minor children, less than 18, directly or indirectly, or allow physical and emotional (psychological) endangerment, maltreatment or abuse of minor children, less than 18, directly or indirectly, whom they are supervising and providing care. There is no age for sexual consent by minors (<18) to Supervisor Caretakers in CAPTA 2010. Sexual consent considerations are irrelevant concerning Supervisors, Caregivers / Caretakers in the criminal statues of CAPTA 2010, Public Law 111-320. This a special law for Child Protection under which violators and perpetrators can be prosecuted. This special Child-Athlete-Caretaker/Supervisor relationship is not a dating, courtship, special friendship or marriage relationship. During dating, courtship, special friendship and marriage relationships, “a person may move to sexual contact on the basis of body language and apparent receptivity, but very few people on a date that results in sexual contact have explicitly asked the other if his or her consent is informed, if he does in fact fully understand what is implied, and all potential conditions or results. Informed consent is implied (or assumed unless disproved) but not stated explicitly.” “A person below the age of consent may agree to sex, knowing all the consequences, but his or her consent is deemed invalid as they are deemed to be a child unaware of the issues and thus incapable of being informed to be able to consent. Therefore, the individual is barred from legally giving informed consent, despite what they may feel in a dating, courtship, special friendship or marriage relationship. [Faden, R. R., & Beauchamp, T. L. (1986). A History and Theory of Informed Consent. New York: Oxford University Pr] Child Saving history was most positively affected following “The Battered-Child Syndrome” report. Battered Child Syndrome, the first report describing Child Abuse in the U.S., was reported in 1962. It evolved into Child Protection Laws. [“The Battered-Child Syndrome”, C. Henry Kempe, M.D.; Frederic N. Silverman, M.D.; Brandt F. Steele, M.D.; William Droegemueller, M.D. ; Henry K. Silver, M.D., JAMA. 1962;181(1):17-24.] Following and with inspiration from “The Battered-Child Syndrome” report, the United States Federal Governmental enacted the first Child Protection Law known as Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) 1972. CAPTA has been amended several times and was last amended in CAPT Reauthorization Act, 2010, Public Law 111-320. CAPTA 2010 was announced and promulgated, funds and resources were allocated to states and public policies were established. • Caretaker / Caregiver is a person who: • Cares for a child • Is providing active care • Has custody or has control of a child • Supervisor, Protects • Permanent Caretaker is a Parent or Legal Guardian • Temporary Substitute Caretaker is a person assigned to care for a child when the permanent caretaker is not present for supervision. Coaches, teachers, camp counselors, bus drivers, babysitters, uncles, boy scout leaders, priests, grandparents, day care employees etc. are in to that category. “Federal legislation provides guidance to States by identifying a minimum set of acts or behaviors that define child abuse and neglect. The Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) (42 U.S.C.A. § 5106g), as amended by the CAPTA Reauthorization Act of 2010, defines child abuse and neglect as, at minimum: “Any recent act or failure to act on the part of a parent or caretaker which results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, sexual abuse or exploitation; or” “An Act of failure to act which presents an imminent risk of serious harm.” “This definition of child abuse and neglect refers specifically to parents and other caregivers. A “child” under this definition generally means a person who is younger than age 18 or who is not an emancipated minor.” [Children's Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services] Problematic Abusers will continue maltreating and abusing as long as they believe they can get away with it. Unfortunately the Will to Enforce the Law is the greatest Prevention and Deterrence of Child and Youth Athlete Abuse. Prevent Child Athlete Cruelty and Abuse. Stop Coaches, Parents and Doctors from Crossing the Criminal and Civil Lines. U.S REP. GEORGE MILLER ASKED GAO TO INVESTIGATE YOUTH ATHLETIC CLUBS’ CHILD ABUSE ALLEGATIONS And Expand Investigation into Child Abuse Reporting Laws to Include Athletics, Extracurricular Activities • {the Following is a Proposed Public Health Amendment to Section 3. Paragraph 2., by Athlete Safety 1st (mbmsrmd) in addition-to or in replacement-of Casey and Boxer Language. The New Language is Capitalized and a recommended in addition-to or in replacement-of S. 1877 described below. One U.S. Sen. in a personal letter reply to my request for my amendment described the Casey-Boxer Bill as to expensive. The Athlete Safety 1st amendment is cost-conscious and inexpensive}: (A) any recent act or failure to act, on the part of a parent or caretaker, “INCLUDING COACH SUBSTITUTE CARETAKERS OF SCHOOL AND NON-SCHOOL SPORTS, RECREATION AND EXERCISE”, that results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, or sexual abuse or exploitation, or an act or failure to act that presents an imminent risk of serious harm; or • {the Following is a Proposed Amendment S. 1877 by Senators Casey and Boxer Language Capitalized Senate Bill 1877 considered by mbmsrmd / Athlete safety 1st to be inadequate (S. 1877 currently in Senate Committee awaiting action}: (B) >ANY DELIBERATE ACT<, on the part of an individual other than a parent or caretaker, that results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, or sexual abuse or exploitation, or that presents an imminent risk of serious harm to a child.’ Everyone, including Doctors, Parents, Health Care Personnel, Coaches, and the entire Athletic Community will report and Pre-Pubescent and Adolescent Children will self report Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, not delay, once they understand Child and Youth Athlete Rights, which will be made “Crystal Clear”, under the new amended 111-320 Public Law and once it becomes Public Policy following promulgation, announcement and dissemination. [U.S. Rep Miller asks GAO to Expand Investigation into Child Abuse Reporting Laws to Include Athletics, Extracurricular Activities Jun 18, 2013 Issues: Labor, Wages and Benefits Committee on Education and the Workforce http://democrats.edworkforce.house.gov/press-release/miller-asks-gao-expand-investigation-child-abuse-reporting-laws-include-athletics ] ___________________________________________________ SAVE CHILD ATHLETES FROM CRUELTY AND ABUSE: STOP COACHES, PARENTS AND DOCTORS FROM CROSSING THE LINE Abuse and harassment persists at all levels of life and all levels of sport, recreation and exercise (SRE). It is a serious issue that affects all humans and all participants i.e. the athletes, coaches, parents, doctors and health care personnel, officials and entire athletic communities. They, in turn, affect the abuse and harassment. Some believe today’s sports reflect society’s tolerance of violence. Violence in sport is defined as physical manifestations that bear no direct relationship to the rules, goals and achievements of sport. 107. The goals of sports are to create a sporting environments with fair play, the complete respect for others. played within the rules of the game, rules of child and youth protection and an atmosphere that will not tolerate unacceptable violent behaviors. Sports builds good character…when coaches’, parents’ and doctors’ characters are exemplary when they coach, parent and care-for the Athletes who participate in the sports. 8. There are many grey areas of violence in sports. Rugged, rough, physical collision and contact sports should be different than non-contact sports in some respects, when played by the rules of the game. 107. But the grey areas are metastasizing to sports that were once purely finesse. No matter, rules of child and youth protection are superior to arbitrary, capricious, non-legislative man made associations' rules of play and are criminal when violated. All types of abuse can occur in sport just as in other institutions i.e. school, workplace, government, religion, scouts and the home. Abuse in sport, sexual or not, discourages girls and women from participation and athletic development. Implementation of abuse policies will help create structural climates where women, girls, men and boys, can participate and feel free to report abusive and maltreatment incidents. “Setting policy on verbal, physical and psychological abuse is also likely to decrease the likelihood of such offenses. The Women’s Sports Foundation acknowledges that abuse occurs in athletics and seeks to prevent its occurrence through the development of this policy and position statement.” 119. The Surgeon General of the United States Workshop 2005 included Coaches among potential targeted perpetrators of Child Abuse and Neglect. [Surgeon General's Workshop on Making Prevention of Child Maltreatment a National Priority: Implementing Innovations of a Public Health Approach, Office of the Surgeon General (US); 2005. NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, 2005] Currently, violence and abuse in sports have been neglected by many dysfunctional systems in crisis, some of whom were named by the Surgeon General and others included by this reporter following further research. These systems in crisis have resulted, sometimes from ignorance of the law, error, lack of will to enforce the law, and/ or frank maliciousness, resulting in obstruction of CAAS Prevention: • Public Health Services • Sports Medicine • Social /Child Welfare Systems • Criminal Justice Departments • Education-Awareness Groups • Federal High School Athletic Federations • State High School Athletic Associations • Non-School Leagues and Associations Everyone knows SRE accidents happen, while playing by the rules of the game, in safe SRE environments, with proper athlete protection, coaching supervision and conduct. Serious Injuries and Deaths that occur during blameless circumstances are Inherent and Natural to the game that athletes play. They are called Accidental and Not-Preventable. An aggressive clean football tackle that fractures an arm is an Accident and Not Preventable. Conversely, Preventable, Not Accidental Injuries and Deaths occur at a rate of approximately fifty per-cent. Preventable, Not Accidental Injuries and Deaths of SRE Children (<18) Athletes are secondary to severe punishments, injury mismanagements, such as concussion, over-use exercise, physical assaults and participation during severe weather conditions i.e. dangerous heat index, poor air quality and electrical storms to name a few. Recently I was consulted concerning push-up punishment to an adolescent swimmer that resulted in a Preventable, Not-Accidental torn shoulder labrum and dislocation necessitating surgery. The violation was reported to authorities and will probably result in serious consequences. Child SRE Coaches are “Temporary Substitute Caretakers” (TSC) in the eyes of the Public Law 111-320, Child Abuse Prevention Treatment and Reauthorization Act 2010 and in the eyes of the U.S. Surgeon General and the Kentucky Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) and Child Protection Services (CPS). [Micheal B. Minix, SR., M.D., Journal of the Kentucky Medical Association, Page 384, September 2012 / vol 110] STATISTICS SUPPORT THE REASON FOR CHILD ATHLETE SAVING • ~45,000,000 (~60%) U.S. Children played one School or Non-School Amateur Sport 2010. [47.] • “According to the CDC, more than half of all sports injuries in children are preventable.” [ 28.] • Approximately 8,000 children are treated in emergency rooms each day for sports-related injuries.[2] • High school athletes suffer 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations each year. [41] • There are three times as many catastrophic football injuries among high school athletes as college athletes. [42] • Emergency department visits for concussions sustained during organized team sports doubled among 8–13 year olds between 1997 and 2007 and nearly tripled among older youth. [31] • Concussion rates more than doubled among students age 8–19 participating in sports like basketball, soccer and football between 1997 and 2007, even as participation in those sports declined. [31] • More than 248,000 children visited hospital emergency departments in 2009 for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries related to sports and recreation. [35] - [48.] • 31 high school players died of heat stroke complications between 1995 and 2009. [36] • The number of heat-related injuries from 1997 to 2006 increased 133 percent. Youth accounted for the largest proportion of heat-related injuries or 47.6 percent. [39] - [48.] • The incidence of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in high school athletes ranges from .28 to 1 death per 100,000 high school athletes annually in the U.S.[31] - [48.] • Thus, if an estimated 50% of Child Athletes Sports Injuries are preventable; these are Not-Accidental Injuries and are not inherent or natural to the game that the Child Athlete was playing. Thus they are secondary to Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) by definition. We need to save Child Athletes from CAAS. Please see more statistics below. Strength is the cornerstone of every sport, but injuries during improper supervision of Strength Training by unqualified Strength Training Coaches can become the rock bottom of an Athlete’s career. The American College of Sports Medicine notes that Child and Youth Athletes require special considerations when designing an exercise program, because young Athletes body systems are immature and have individual human growth and development timelines. “The AAP does note, however, that most injuries occur when the children and youth are poorly supervised or practicing with poor technique.” A complete history and physical doctor examination is the first step, followed by considerations for an Athlete’s medical conditions and then followed by an individualized training program. “NCAA rules say coaches can take only 20 hours a week of their players' time.” Yet college Athletes spend another 20 hours with their Sport mostly in Strength Training. Misfortunately, many players are injured months before the season begins and during the season while Strength Training. [Youth Strength Training: Facts and Fallacies by Avery D. Faigenbaum, Ed.D., FACSM, Am Col Sports Med, Jan 13, 2012 [Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness Pediatrics Vol. 121 No. 4 April 1, 2008 pp. 835 -840 (doi: 10.1542/peds.2007-3790)] [What Are the Dangers of Children Lifting Weights? Dec 1, 2010 by Amy Dixon Living Strong] [NCAA survey delves into practice time, coaches' trust, By Steve Wieberg, USA TODAY 1/15/2011] CHILD ATHLETE SAVING HISTORY Battered Child Syndrome, the first report describing Child Abuse in the U.S., was reported in 1962. It evolved into Child Protection Laws. [“The Battered-Child Syndrome”, C. Henry Kempe, M.D.; Frederic N. Silverman, M.D.; Brandt F. Steele, M.D.; William Droegemueller, M.D. ; Henry K. Silver, M.D., JAMA. 1962;181(1):17-24.] The United States Federal Governmental enacted the first Child Protection Law known as Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) 1972. CAPTA has been amended several times and was last amended in CAPT Reauthorization Act, 2010, Public Law 111-320. CAPTA 2010 was announced and promulgated, funds and resources were allocated and public policies were established. Nineteen (19) years later, in 1981 Dr. Edwin R. Guise and Dr. Richard M. Ball, in disapproval, first described the terms respectively: • “Socially Approved Athletic Child Abuse” • “Battered-Child-Athlete-Syndrome”, [ 3.] The Child Athlete Saving Bible is Human Rights in Youth Sport: (Ethics and Sport) by Paulo David that was published by Routledge December 16, 2004 “The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries. Sport is an international language that everyone understands and a fundamental building block of Children’s Rights. Paulo David's work makes it clear, however, that too often competitive sport fails to recognize the value of respect for international child rights norms and standards and respect for human rights of child athletes.” [critical review, Amazon.com] This text, purchased by this reporter, was thoroughly researched and was a fundamental text for Child Athlete Saving movement. Mr. Paulo David is Deputy Director, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. The Thin Thirty, a book by Shannon Ragland, published in 2007 by Set Shot Press, was a monumental action toward Child and Youth Athlete Safety and Prevention of Child Athlete Abuse. TTT was also historic in the definition of Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome. The Thin Thirty enabled our team to find our teammates from our 1962 University of Kentucky Football Team that resulted in our reunion in 2008 and discussion and research of our football tragedy. TTT told our tragic football story of brain-washing brutality that reduced our squad from 88 to 33 athletes. Our thanks to Shannon Ragland and his family. So should the thanks of all Child and Youth Athletes. In 2007 Women's Sports Foundation began setting policy on verbal, physical, psychological and sexual abuse in an attempt to decrease these offenses. [Addressing the Issue of Verbal, Physical and Psychological Abuse of Athletes: The Foundation Position Oct 7, 2007 By Women's Sports Foundation] Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) Forensic definition by Micheal B. Minix Sr,. M.D. began following preparation in 2007 for the June 2008 UK Football Reunion. We surveyed our teams’ injuries: “The Longitudinal and Retrospective Study of The Impact of Coaching Behaviors on the 1961-1962 University of Kentucky Football Wildcats” by Kay Collier McLaughlin, Ph.D., Micheal B. Minix Sr. M.D., Twila Minix, R.N., Jim Overman, Scott Brogdon. Subsequently, CAPPAA, Athlete Safety 1st was published and copy written 2009. As a consultant to the National Cheer Safety Foundation and other groups, this author/editor taught CAAS to advocates and organizations incorporating training following instruction in Child Abuse Recognition Education (C.A.R.E.) sponsored by Prevent Child Abuse KY and U of Louisville Department Of Pediatric Forensic Medicine. Child Athlete Abuse was first authored by Micheal B. Minix, SR., M.D. in 2009. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, A New Disease was further described November 15, 2010. Permission for use was granted to Kimberly Archie for the Cheer Safety and Risk Management Guide. (3537 words) by Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D. cc Sept. 2009 with copyright restrictions on “changes, alterations and other uses such as redistribution and sale of this document are not to be made without my permission.”* Permission was granted to Cheryl Hoffman, Educational Director and assistant to the Executive Director for the National Collegiate Acrobatics and Tumbling Association, August 15, 2011 to use articles from my website Athlete Safety 1st in the “Risk Management Standards and Manual” online at: http://issuu.com/ncata/docs/risk_management?viewMode=magazine. CAPPAA, (Child and Adult Physical and Psychological [Emotional] Athlete Abuse), a Public Health Crisis, was prepared for Presentation to Deputy Secretary Steven Nunn, the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services April 24, 2010 by mbmsrmd and the CAPPAA Team. Child Athlete Abuse was discussed during break-out session during this reporter's C.A.R.E. training. C.A.R.E. is Child Abuse Recognition Education. In the past Child Athletes have been overlooked. C.A.R.E. staff reported after a pointed question from this reporter, mbmsrmd, concerning the investigation of Coaches for Child Abuse 1 month following training after the question had been submitted up the ladder to DCBS top ranking officials: “The Child Safety Branch of DCBS (Department of Community Based Services which has a branch in each Kentucky county) has responded to the question regarding coaches as caregivers”……“Our agency [DCBS] investigates abuse and neglect allegations involving situations where a person is providing care, has custody or has control of a child. Teachers, camp counselors, bus drivers, babysitters, grandparents, coaches etc. fit in to that category if they are left to care for a child and the parent is not present (for supervision and caregiving). To my knowledge we are investigating these type situations in this manner across the state. If [DCBS] staff have questions about whether a person falls into these categories, they can consult with Central Office or their regional attorney.” [C.A.R.E. Coordinator, Feb. 27, 2009] “Child Abuse Recognition Education is a very important endeavor. The mission of C.A.R.E. (Child Abuse Recognition Education) is to develop, support and grow a statewide network of doctors, key medical personnel and medical office staff who have committed themselves to ensuring the children in their communities are free from abuse and neglect as a result of receiving office-based training from their medical peers.” [Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky, http://www.pcaky.org/care.html] This reporter, Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D., was trained and certified with many other doctors by C.A.R.E. for the instruction of physicians and their office staff in their community based offices about the recognition of Child Abuse. C.A.R.E. is a division of Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky. Child SRE Coaches are recognized as “Temporary Substitute Caretakers” (TSC) in the eyes of the Public Law 111-320, Child Abuse Prevention Treatment and Reauthorization Act and the Kentucky Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) and Child Protection Services (CPS). “A bill aimed at improving safety for high school athletes won initial legislative approval.” House Bill 383 became Kentucky Law: 2009 Ky. Acts ch. 90, sec. 2, effective March 24, 2009. “Dr. Michael Minix Sr., a physician and former University of Kentucky football player, testified in favor of HB 383 before the KY House of Representatives, Education Committee that coaches don’t always abide by medical guidelines and that they need to be better educated about risks to players.” “Athlete abuse is on the rise in the United States,” Minix said. [Panel OKs Athlete Safety Bill, Feb 25, 2009, by Stephenie Steitzer Courier Journal Newspaper, Louisville, KY] Forty-nine years after the report of Battered Child Syndrome, April 29, 2011, Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D., this reporter, presented the Forensic Definition of “Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, A New Disease” at the Athlete Abuse Summit, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA. This was the first public conference report of mbmsrmd’s CAAS’s definition, following his scholarly inquiry, investigation, interpretation of facts and correction of accepted theories and laws because of new facts. This reporter has been a member of the Brunel International Research Network for Athlete Welfare (BIRNAW) since Nov19, 2010/ BIRNAW is a group of international researchers who are working together to promote athlete welfare through research and consultancy. Brunel University is in East London, UK. Members are provided article and updates, periodically, concerning international Child Athlete Welfare. In Suite 101, Terry Zeigler reported, “While 2010 has become known as the “Year of Concussion Awareness”, 2011 needs to become the “Year of Child Athlete Abuse Awareness”. “Actions by coaches resulting in youth athlete injuries need to be taken seriously by both the parents and by athletic administrations. Immediate action should be taken by the team’s athletic administrations to remove the coach, report the incident to the local authorities, and assist in providing the authorities with their full cooperation during any ensuing investigation.” [Suite101: The Athlete Abuse Summits report from Terry Zeigler: http://terry-zeigler.suite101.com/child-athlete-abuse-syndrome–when-athletes-pay-the-price-a393385] Different well-intentioned organizations have worked to improve education and awareness of all parties, particularly Coaches. They have gathered insignificant permanent effects on sports violence and abuse. Most well-intentioned have very small power and authority. So, who will rescue and prevent child and adult athlete physical and psychological (emotional) injuries and deaths and sexual abuse? Multitudes have been recruited for this cause from all business and professional fields, but fallen on deaf ears. Finally, well known, celebrity sports organizations and health care personnel have weighed in on the problem. March, 2013 The Cal Ripkin Jr. Foundation hosted a summit on Abuse of Child Athletes. Their summit focused on Child Athlete Sexual Abuse. Ripken he decided to take on the chief question before the sporting community: “What can we do to make kids safer?” [March 19, 2013 by Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun] That was good news. This reporter has awaited Sports Medicine doctors advocacy for years. Dr. James Andrews has just now stepped-up to the plate. "He's had enough." “Dr. Andrews is the father of modern sports medicine and one of the most influential figures in the world of athletics. In his new book (2013) “Any Given Monday”, he distills his practical wisdom and professional advice to combat a growing epidemic of injury among sports’ most vulnerable population: its young athletes.” It appears, from this editor’s opinion that Dr. Andrews in his new book, Any Given Monday, (Jan 2013) has called out: • Doctors, who have failed Child and Youth Athletes because they have failed to initiate an Awareness Campaign against Preventable, Not-Accidental sports injuries and deaths • Parents, Guardians and Coaches, who have pushed and punished Child and Youth Athletes beyond their physical and emotional limits causing or allowing to be caused directly or indirectly Preventable, Not Accidental Overuse and other injuries. [Athlete Safety 1st, http://www.cappaa.com/] What do Coaches, parents and doctors of child and youth athletes have in common? They often share the responsibility for child and youth athletes’ protection and, likewise, their injuries and deaths. Coaches and parents are caretakers according to child protection laws, when child athletes are in their care, custody and control. Responsibility matters. Doctors are responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of athlete morbidity. Medical examiners and coroners are responsible for examination of deceased child and youth athletes following Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE) mortality. All three groups are responsible for reporting the following serious injury or death circumstances: Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome is a Short Title for a Clustering of Child (<18) or Youth (15-18) Athlete Serious Injury, Disease and/or Death secondary to: ► Physical endangerment, maltreatment and/or abuse ► Psychological (Emotional) endangerment, maltreatment and/or abuse ► Sexual Abuse ► Failed child custodial protection ► Negligent care giving supervision ► Human rights violations ► That were inflicted, caused, created, or allowed to be inflicted, caused, created, directly or indirectly by the Problematic Coach, including the Strength Training, Conditioning and other specialty Coach, Problematic Parent or other Problematic Caretaker Person who has Child and Youth Athlete custodial protection, supervision, care and control during Sports, Recreation and Exercise Participation ► Failure to report the morbidity and mortality to Authorities is Illegal. [1.] [6.] ► In most United States, Children are minors when less than 18 years of age. ► The United Nations define Youth as persons between the ages of 15-24. The following are examples of the potential consequences when Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome is Covered-up and Not-Reported: The Judge ruled Tuesday, July 30, 2013, that Penn State’s then-president Graham Spanier, retired university vice president Gary Schultz, then-athletic director Tim Curley will be tried on charges of cover-up, perjury, obstruction, endangering the welfare of children, failure to properly report suspected abuse, hiding evidence from investigators and lying to the grand jury, and conspiracy from the case against Coach Jerry Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, who was convicted for sexually preying on and abusing boys. [By Tim Polzer, July 30, 2013 Sports Illustrated Wire] Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome and Cruelty to Children in Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE) are matters of importance to Doctors and Health Care Personnel. They summons all Doctors and Health Care Personnel into action for the Awareness and Prevention of these Child Athlete Preventable, Not-Accidental morbidities and mortalities. At any given time, one or another of the three adults might be blameful. All three are mandated reporters in most of the United States. This publication’s 3 main objectives are to: 1. Prevent Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) and Cruelty to Child and Youth Athletes, who participate in Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE) 2. Promote Athlete Safety 1st 3. Prevent Criminal and Civil Risks for “Problematic Coaches” who don’t know their legal relationship with Children who participate in SRE These objectives are to be accomplished by utilizing Education, Teaching, Scholarship, Research, Advocacy and Legislation. “Problematic caretakers” will continue maltreating and abusing athletes as long as they believe they can get away with it. Most individuals have a clear understanding of the meaning of violence. But the laws, policies and practices that are in place to protect children outside of sport are not always applied to organized SRE play. Within certain sports, there are a variety of definitions and situational circumstances that distort the meaning of the word, violence. “Violence in sport can be defined as behavior that causes harm, occurs outside of the rules of the sport and is unrelated to the competitive objectives of the activity.” [2.] That is the definition by sports concerns. Violence against children is universally defined and superior to sports. Let’s be clear from the beginning. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome and Cruelty to Children in SRE is medical doctor business. They summons all doctors for awareness and prevention of Child Athlete morbidity and mortality. If “problematic coaches and parents” are the culprits, their unlawful behaviors should trigger Forensic Medicine Investigations immediately following the incidents. Child is defined as a human less than the age of majority, usually 18 years in each United State. The United Nations define youth as persons between the ages of 15 and 24. UNESCO understands that young people are a heterogeneous group in constant evolution and that the experience of ‘being young’ varies enormously across regions and within countries.” Minor Youth would be age 15-18. [3.] When Child is used in this publication, minor youth are also implied. Coaches, Parents, Guardians and every Caretaker cross the line, when they cause, create or allow others to cause or create, directly or indirectly, circumstances that push and punish Child and Youth Athletes beyond their Physical and Emotional Limits and perpetrate Sexual Abuse. Doctors and Health Care Personnel cross the line when they cover-up or fail to document and Report Forensic Histories, Physical Examinations and Treatments for Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome. Doctors and Health Care Personnel risk Criminal Charges for Failure to Report Child Abuse and potential Civil Law Suits, when unreported Child Abuse escalates because it was not reported. All Reporters have immunity to HIPPA laws and anonymity from their identity disclosure. Child Athletes and Youth Athletes, less than 18, are Children first and Athletes second participating in SRE during every nanosecond. Child Athletes (<18) are defined and governed by their Age of Minority, not the activity in which they participate. “No Sport is a Kingdom unto its own,”…. “No one is above the Law.” said former Secretary of State and avid Sport Fan, Condeleezza Rice. [11.] The Code of Silence in Amateur Sports is nothing but a cover-up for bad Coaching behaviors and Child Athlete dangers. For example: The Case of the Penn State alleged cover-up will be tried later this year (2013) Every Child is covered by the Umbrella of Child Protection Law on every inch of ground, and every venue, during every nanosecond of time. That Umbrella is passed from Caretaker to Caretaker as Children pass from one venue to another. Children are never without the Umbrella of Child Protection Law, until they reach the age of adulthood, 18 in most United States. Child and Youth Athletes Do Not relinquish their Human Rights to the Coach, School, Athletic Association or anyone when they sign-up to participate in Sports, Recreation and Exercise. There are 2 different groups of Amateur Athletes under consideration i.e. Children and Adult Athletes. This report is about Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, but most of the content it is applicable to Adult Athletes. All Coaches of Child Athletes, age less than 18, are Temporary Substitute Caretakers of Children, while the Children are in the Care, Custody and Control of the Coach during their participation in Sports, Recreation and Exercise. Child Abuse Statutes and other Legal Statutes in Adult Criminal Court are applicable, depending on the state court. In some states complex issues can be tried in both Family and Adult Criminal Courts simultaneously and it is not double jeopardy. For example in KY see KRS 620.120. However, children victims and withesses have Rights in Court. Children should not testify in public, photographed and videotaped court rooms for many reasons. Conversely, Adult (>18) Amateur Athletes in Sports Recreation and Exercise, College, Olympics and elsewhere enter into a Fiduciary Trust Standard of Care when they commit to play-for and provide-their-athletic-abilities in exchange for their Participation with Proper Care, Safety, Welfare and possibly Education. Legal Statutes in Adult Criminal Court are applicable.

Problematic Abusers will continue maltreating and abusing as long as they believe they can get away with it. Unfortunately the Will to Enforce the Law is the greatest Prevention and Deterrence of Child and Youth Athlete Abuse.

Prevent Child Athlete Cruelty and Abuse. Stop Coaches, Parents and Doctors from Crossing the Criminal and Civil Lines.

U.S REP. GEORGE MILLER ASKED GAO TO INVESTIGATE YOUTH ATHLETIC CLUBS’ CHILD ABUSE ALLEGATIONS And Expand Investigation into Child Abuse Reporting Laws to Include Athletics, Extracurricular Activities

• {the Following is a Proposed Public Health Amendment to Section 3. Paragraph 2., by Athlete Safety 1st (mbmsrmd) in addition-to or in replacement-of Casey and Boxer Language. The New Language is Capitalized and a recommended in addition-to or in replacement-of S. 1877 described below. One U.S. Sen. in a personal letter reply to my request for my amendment described the Casey-Boxer Bill as to expensive.
The Athlete Safety 1st amendment is cost-conscious and inexpensive}:

(A) any recent act or failure to act, on the part of a parent or caretaker, “INCLUDING COACH SUBSTITUTE CARETAKERS OF SCHOOL AND NON-SCHOOL SPORTS, RECREATION AND EXERCISE”, that results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, or sexual abuse or exploitation, or an act or failure to act that presents an imminent risk of serious harm; or

• {the Following is a Proposed Amendment S. 1877 by Senators Casey and Boxer Language Capitalized Senate Bill 1877 considered by mbmsrmd / Athlete safety 1st to be inadequate (S. 1877 currently in Senate Committee awaiting action}:

(B) >ANY DELIBERATE ACT<, on the part of an individual other than a parent or caretaker, that results in death, serious physical or emotional harm, or sexual abuse or exploitation, or that presents an imminent risk of serious harm to a child.’ Everyone, including Doctors, Parents, Health Care Personnel, Coaches, and the entire Athletic Community will report and Pre-Pubescent and Adolescent Children will self report Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, not delay, once they understand Child and Youth Athlete Rights, which will be made “Crystal Clear”, under the new amended 111-320 Public Law and once it becomes Public Policy following promulgation, announcement and dissemination. [U.S. Rep Miller asks GAO to Expand Investigation into Child Abuse Reporting Laws to Include Athletics, Extracurricular Activities Jun 18, 2013 Issues: Labor, Wages and Benefits Committee on Education and the Workforce http://democrats.edworkforce.house.gov/press-release/miller-asks-gao-expand-investigation-child-abuse-reporting-laws-include-athletics ] [ http://www.cappaa.com/u-s-rep-george-miller-d-calif-asked-gao-to-investigate-youth-athletic-clubs-child-abuse-allegations ] “Parens Patriae” Doctrine Grants Power and Authority of the State to protect minor Children, age less than 18, and other persons who are legally unable to protect themselves. The Etymology of “Parens Patriae” is from Latin meaning Government is “Parent of the Nation” “Parens Patriae” doctrine is the legal framework for the Special Standard of Child Care STATES MUST COMPLY WITH FEDERAL LAW, CAPTA 2010 • State Child Abuse Performance Procedures and Actions should reflect CAPTA 2010 because of the Federal Funds and Grants received by States • States are mandated to alter their powers, duties and management functions satisfying CAPTA 2010 compliance with the purposes for which the Federal Funds and Grants are made available to States by Federal Law ◙ In U.S., the State is the “Supreme Guardian” of all Children but must satisfying CAPTA 2010 compliance with the purposes for which the Federal Funds and Grants are made available to States by Federal Law ◙ If Parents, Guardians and Substitute Caretakers such as teachers and Coaches are Unable, Unwilling or Fail to Protect their Children or other Children when they are in the custody and control of Substitute Caretakers like Coaches: ◙ The Government has the poser and will Protect Child Safety and ensure proper Child Care ◙ The State has the power / authority to take action to Protect the Child from harm. [46.] ◙ Tripartite Relationship = PARENT + CHILD + STATE ◙ “Parens Patriae” Balances the Rights and Responsibilities among Parents-Child-State as guided by Federal Laws ◙ The Umbrella of Child Protection follows children wherever they go; in every venue Same Tripartite Relationship exists for the Coach Coach-Caretaker + Child-Athlete + State ◙ It is Permissible for the Coach-Caretaker to use His/Her Methods of Coaching children in Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE): ◙ Providing the Coach complies with the Special Standards of Care issued by State for a Child ◙ The Tripartite Coach-Caretaker + Child-Athlete + State Relationship is In Effect during Practices, Camps, Over-Nights, Travel Teams, Closed Practices. (These are the “Be Vigilant for Parents and Guardians Venues”) ◙ For Children the Supreme Power of the State following Federal CAPTA 2010 mandates are in Effect On Every inch of Ground, Every Second of Time in the United States [ http://www.cappaa.com/save-child-athletes-from-cruelty-and-abuse ] [ http://www.cappaa.com/category/child-athlete-abuse-syndrome ] [ http://www.cappaa.com/save-child-athletes-from-cruelty-and-abuse ] References: 1. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome: Medical-Legal and Forensic Definition http://www.cappaa.com/child-athlete-abuse-syndrome-medical-legal-and-forensic-definition 2. Conversation with Paul Melia and Karri Dawson live, beyond the Cheers 3. UNESCO 4. Surgeon General’s Workshop on Making Prevention of Child Maltreatment a National Priority: Implementing Innovations of a Public Health Approach, Surgeon General’s Workshop Proceedings Lister Hill Auditorium, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland March 30–31, 2005 8. The Great Football Coach (Or Basketball Coach) research paper. by Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D. 107. TRUE SPORT LIVES HERE - Anastasia, G. // George, D 119. WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION - Addressing the Issue of Verbal, Physical and Psychological Abuse of Athletes: The Foundation Position _____________________________________________________________________ Abuse and harassment persists at all levels of life and all levels of sport, recreation and exercise (SRE). It is a serious issue that affects all humans and all participants i.e. the athletes, coaches, parents, doctors and health care personnel, officials and entire athletic communities. They, in turn, affect the abuse and harassment. Some believe today’s sports reflect society’s tolerance of violence. Violence in sport is defined as physical manifestations that bear no direct relationship to the rules, goals and achievements of sport. 107. The goals of sports are to create a sporting environments with fair play, the complete respect for others. played within the rules of the game, rules of child and youth protection and an atmosphere that will not tolerate unacceptable violent behaviors. Sports builds good character…when coaches’, parents’ and doctors’ characters are exemplary when they coach, parent and care-for the Athletes who participate in the sports. 8. There are many grey areas of violence in sports. Rugged, rough, physical collision and contact sports should be different than non-contact sports in some respects, when played by the rules of the game. 107. But the grey areas are metastasizing to sports that were once purely finesse. No matter, rules of child and youth protection are superior to arbitrary, capricious, non-legislative man made associations' rules of play and are criminal when violated. All types of abuse can occur in sport just as in other institutions i.e. school, workplace, government, religion, scouts and the home. Abuse in sport, sexual or not, discourages girls and women from participation and athletic development. Implementation of abuse policies will help create structural climates where women, girls, men and boys, can participate and feel free to report abusive and maltreatment incidents. “Setting policy on verbal, physical and psychological abuse is also likely to decrease the likelihood of such offenses. The Women’s Sports Foundation acknowledges that abuse occurs in athletics and seeks to prevent its occurrence through the development of this policy and position statement.” 119. The Surgeon General of the United States Workshop 2005 included Coaches among potential targeted perpetrators of Child Abuse and Neglect. [Surgeon General's Workshop on Making Prevention of Child Maltreatment a National Priority: Implementing Innovations of a Public Health Approach, Office of the Surgeon General (US); 2005. NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, 2005] Currently, violence and abuse in sports have been neglected by many dysfunctional systems in crisis, some of whom were named by the Surgeon General and others included by this reporter following further research. These systems in crisis have resulted, sometimes from ignorance of the law, error, lack of will to enforce the law, and/ or frank maliciousness, resulting in obstruction of CAAS Prevention: • Public Health Services • Sports Medicine • Social /Child Welfare Systems • Criminal Justice Departments • Education-Awareness Groups • Federal High School Athletic Federations • State High School Athletic Associations • Non-School Leagues and Associations Everyone knows SRE accidents happen, while playing by the rules of the game, in safe SRE environments, with proper athlete protection, coaching supervision and conduct. Serious Injuries and Deaths that occur during blameless circumstances are Inherent and Natural to the game that athletes play. They are called Accidental and Not-Preventable. An aggressive clean football tackle that fractures an arm is an Accident and Not Preventable. Conversely, Preventable, Not Accidental Injuries and Deaths occur at a rate of approximately fifty per-cent. Preventable, Not Accidental Injuries and Deaths of SRE Children (<18) Athletes are secondary to severe punishments, injury mismanagements, such as concussion, over-use exercise, physical assaults and participation during severe weather conditions i.e. dangerous heat index, poor air quality and electrical storms to name a few. Recently I was consulted concerning push-up punishment to an adolescent swimmer that resulted in a Preventable, Not-Accidental torn shoulder labrum and dislocation necessitating surgery. The violation was reported to authorities and will probably result in serious consequences. Child SRE Coaches are “Temporary Substitute Caretakers” (TSC) in the eyes of the Public Law 111-320, Child Abuse Prevention Treatment and Reauthorization Act 2010 and in the eyes of the U.S. Surgeon General and the Kentucky Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) and Child Protection Services (CPS). [Micheal B. Minix, SR., M.D., Journal of the Kentucky Medical Association, Page 384, September 2012 / vol 110] STATISTICS SUPPORT THE REASON FOR CHILD ATHLETE SAVING • ~45,000,000 (~60%) U.S. Children played one School or Non-School Amateur Sport 2010. [47.] • “According to the CDC, more than half of all sports injuries in children are preventable.” [ 28.] • Approximately 8,000 children are treated in emergency rooms each day for sports-related injuries.[2] • High school athletes suffer 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations each year. [41] • There are three times as many catastrophic football injuries among high school athletes as college athletes. [42] • Emergency department visits for concussions sustained during organized team sports doubled among 8–13 year olds between 1997 and 2007 and nearly tripled among older youth. [31] • Concussion rates more than doubled among students age 8–19 participating in sports like basketball, soccer and football between 1997 and 2007, even as participation in those sports declined. [31] • More than 248,000 children visited hospital emergency departments in 2009 for concussions and other traumatic brain injuries related to sports and recreation. [35] - [48.] • 31 high school players died of heat stroke complications between 1995 and 2009. [36] • The number of heat-related injuries from 1997 to 2006 increased 133 percent. Youth accounted for the largest proportion of heat-related injuries or 47.6 percent. [39] - [48.] • The incidence of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in high school athletes ranges from .28 to 1 death per 100,000 high school athletes annually in the U.S.[31] - [48.] • Thus, if an estimated 50% of Child Athletes Sports Injuries are preventable; these are Not-Accidental Injuries and are not inherent or natural to the game that the Child Athlete was playing. Thus they are secondary to Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) by definition. We need to save Child Athletes from CAAS. Please see more statistics below. Strength is the cornerstone of every sport, but injuries during improper supervision of Strength Training by unqualified Strength Training Coaches can become the rock bottom of an Athlete’s career. The American College of Sports Medicine notes that Child and Youth Athletes require special considerations when designing an exercise program, because young Athletes body systems are immature and have individual human growth and development timelines. “The AAP does note, however, that most injuries occur when the children and youth are poorly supervised or practicing with poor technique.” A complete history and physical doctor examination is the first step, followed by considerations for an Athlete’s medical conditions and then followed by an individualized training program. “NCAA rules say coaches can take only 20 hours a week of their players' time.” Yet college Athletes spend another 20 hours with their Sport mostly in Strength Training. Misfortunately, many players are injured months before the season begins and during the season while Strength Training. [Youth Strength Training: Facts and Fallacies by Avery D. Faigenbaum, Ed.D., FACSM, Am Col Sports Med, Jan 13, 2012 [Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness Pediatrics Vol. 121 No. 4 April 1, 2008 pp. 835 -840 (doi: 10.1542/peds.2007-3790)] [What Are the Dangers of Children Lifting Weights? Dec 1, 2010 by Amy Dixon Living Strong] [NCAA survey delves into practice time, coaches' trust, By Steve Wieberg, USA TODAY 1/15/2011] CHILD ATHLETE SAVING HISTORY Battered Child Syndrome, the first report describing Child Abuse in the U.S., was reported in 1962. It evolved into Child Protection Laws. [“The Battered-Child Syndrome”, C. Henry Kempe, M.D.; Frederic N. Silverman, M.D.; Brandt F. Steele, M.D.; William Droegemueller, M.D. ; Henry K. Silver, M.D., JAMA. 1962;181(1):17-24.] The United States Federal Governmental enacted the first Child Protection Law known as Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) 1972. CAPTA has been amended several times and was last amended in CAPT Reauthorization Act, 2010, Public Law 111-320. CAPTA 2010 was announced and promulgated, funds and resources were allocated and public policies were established. Nineteen (19) years later, in 1981 Dr. Edwin R. Guise and Dr. Richard M. Ball, in disapproval, first described the terms respectively: • “Socially Approved Athletic Child Abuse” • “Battered-Child-Athlete-Syndrome”, [ 3.] The Child Athlete Saving Bible is Human Rights in Youth Sport: (Ethics and Sport) by Paulo David that was published by Routledge December 16, 2004 “The human rights of children have been recognized in the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ratified by 192 countries. Sport is an international language that everyone understands and a fundamental building block of Children’s Rights. Paulo David's work makes it clear, however, that too often competitive sport fails to recognize the value of respect for international child rights norms and standards and respect for human rights of child athletes.” [critical review, Amazon.com] This text, purchased by this reporter, was thoroughly researched and was a fundamental text for Child Athlete Saving movement. Mr. Paulo David is Deputy Director, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. The Thin Thirty, a book by Shannon Ragland, published in 2007 by Set Shot Press, was a monumental action toward Child and Youth Athlete Safety and Prevention of Child Athlete Abuse. TTT was also historic in the definition of Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome. The Thin Thirty enabled our team to find our teammates from our 1962 University of Kentucky Football Team that resulted in our reunion in 2008 and discussion and research of our football tragedy. TTT told our tragic football story of brain-washing brutality that reduced our squad from 88 to 33 athletes. Our thanks to Shannon Ragland and his family. So should the thanks of all Child and Youth Athletes. In 2007 Women's Sports Foundation began setting policy on verbal, physical, psychological and sexual abuse in an attempt to decrease these offenses. [Addressing the Issue of Verbal, Physical and Psychological Abuse of Athletes: The Foundation Position Oct 7, 2007 By Women's Sports Foundation] Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) definition by Micheal B. Minix Sr,. M.D. began following preparation in 2007 for the June 2008 UK Football Reunion. We surveyed our teams’ injuries: “The Longitudinal and Retrospective Study of The Impact of Coaching Behaviors on the 1961-1962 University of Kentucky Football Wildcats” by Kay Collier McLaughlin, Ph.D., Micheal B. Minix Sr. M.D., Twila Minix, R.N., Jim Overman, Scott Brogdon. Subsequently, CAPPAA, Athlete Safety 1st was published and copy written 2009. As a consultant to the National Cheer Safety Foundation and other groups, this author/editor taught CAAS to advocates and organizations incorporating training following instruction in Child Abuse Recognition Education (C.A.R.E.) sponsored by Prevent Child Abuse KY and U of Louisville Department Of Pediatric Forensic Medicine. Child Athlete Abuse was discussed during break-out session during this reporter's C.A.R.E. training. C.A.R.E. is Child Abuse Recognition Education. In the past Child Athletes have been overlooked. C.A.R.E. staff reported after a pointed question from this reporter, mbmsrmd, concerning the investigation of Coaches for Child Abuse 1 month following training after the question had been submitted up the ladder to DCBS top ranking officials: “The Child Safety Branch of DCBS (Department of Community Based Services which has a branch in each Kentucky county) has responded to the question regarding coaches as caregivers”……“Our agency [DCBS] investigates abuse and neglect allegations involving situations where a person is providing care, has custody or has control of a child. Teachers, camp counselors, bus drivers, babysitters, grandparents, coaches etc. fit in to that category if they are left to care for a child and the parent is not present (for supervision and caregiving). To my knowledge we are investigating these type situations in this manner across the state. If [DCBS] staff have questions about whether a person falls into these categories, they can consult with Central Office or their regional attorney.” [C.A.R.E. Coordinator, Feb. 27, 2009] “Child Abuse Recognition Education is a very important endeavor. The mission of C.A.R.E. (Child Abuse Recognition Education) is to develop, support and grow a statewide network of doctors, key medical personnel and medical office staff who have committed themselves to ensuring the children in their communities are free from abuse and neglect as a result of receiving office-based training from their medical peers.” [Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky, http://www.pcaky.org/care.html] This reporter, Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D., was trained and certified with many other doctors by C.A.R.E. for the instruction of physicians and their office staff in their community based offices about the recognition of Child Abuse. C.A.R.E. is a division of Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky. Child SRE Coaches are recognized as “Temporary Substitute Caretakers” (TSC) in the eyes of the Public Law 111-320, Child Abuse Prevention Treatment and Reauthorization Act and the Kentucky Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) and Child Protection Services (CPS). “A bill aimed at improving safety for high school athletes won initial legislative approval.” House Bill 383 became Kentucky Law: 2009 Ky. Acts ch. 90, sec. 2, effective March 24, 2009. “Dr. Michael Minix Sr., a physician and former University of Kentucky football player, testified before the KY House of Representatives, Education Committee that coaches don’t always abide by medical guidelines and that they need to be better educated about risks to players.” “Athlete abuse is on the rise in the United States,” Minix said. [Panel OKs Athlete Safety Bill, Feb 25, 2009, by Stephenie Steitzer Courier Journal Newspaper, Louisville, KY] Forty-nine years after the report of Battered Child Syndrome, April 29, 2011, Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D., this reporter, presented “Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, A New Disease” at the Athlete Abuse Summit, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA. This was the first public conference report of mbmsrmd’s CAAS’s definition, following his scholarly inquiry, investigation, interpretation of facts and correction of accepted theories and laws because of new facts. This reporter has been a member of the Brunel International Research Network for Athlete Welfare (BIRNAW) since Nov19, 2010/ BIRNAW is a group of international researchers who are working together to promote athlete welfare through research and consultancy. Brunel University is in East London, UK. Members are provided article and updates, periodically, concerning international Child Athlete Welfare. In Suite 101, Terry Zeigler reported, “While 2010 has become known as the “Year of Concussion Awareness”, 2011 needs to become the “Year of Child Athlete Abuse Awareness”. “Actions by coaches resulting in youth athlete injuries need to be taken seriously by both the parents and by athletic administrations. Immediate action should be taken by the team’s athletic administrations to remove the coach, report the incident to the local authorities, and assist in providing the authorities with their full cooperation during any ensuing investigation.” [Suite101: The Athlete Abuse Summits report from Terry Zeigler:http://terry-zeigler.suite101.com/child-athlete-abuse-syndrome–when-athletes-pay-the-price-a393385] Different well-intentioned organizations have worked to improve education and awareness of all parties, particularly Coaches. They have gathered insignificant permanent effects on sports violence and abuse. Most well-intentioned have very small power and authority. So, who will rescue and prevent child and adult athlete physical and psychological (emotional) injuries and deaths and sexual abuse? Multitudes have been recruited for this cause from all business and professional fields, but fallen on deaf ears. Finally, well known, celebrity sports organizations and health care personnel have weighed in on the problem. March, 2013 The Cal Ripkin Jr. Foundation hosted a summit on Abuse of Child Athletes. Their summit focused on Child Athlete Sexual Abuse. Ripken he decided to take on the chief question before the sporting community: “What can we do to make kids safer?” [March 19, 2013 by Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun] That was good news. This reporter has awaited Sports Medicine doctors advocacy for years. Dr. James Andrews has just now stepped-up to the plate. "He's had enough." “Dr. Andrews is the father of modern sports medicine and one of the most influential figures in the world of athletics. In his new book (2013) “Any Given Monday”, he distills his practical wisdom and professional advice to combat a growing epidemic of injury among sports’ most vulnerable population: its young athletes.” It appears, from this editor’s opinion that Dr. Andrews in his new book, Any Given Monday, (Jan 2013) has called out: • Doctors, who have failed Child and Youth Athletes because they have failed to initiate an Awareness Campaign against Preventable, Not-Accidental sports injuries and deaths • Parents, Guardians and Coaches, who have pushed and punished Child and Youth Athletes beyond their physical and emotional limits causing or allowing to be caused directly or indirectly Preventable, Not Accidental Overuse and other injuries. [Athlete Safety 1st, http://www.cappaa.com/] What do Coaches, parents and doctors of child and youth athletes have in common? They often share the responsibility for child and youth athletes’ protection and, likewise, their injuries and deaths. Coaches and parents are caretakers according to child protection laws, when child athletes are in their care, custody and control. Responsibility matters. Doctors are responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of athlete morbidity. Medical examiners and coroners are responsible for examination of deceased child and youth athletes following Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE) mortality. All three groups are responsible for reporting the following serious injury or death circumstances: Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome is a Short Title for a Clustering of Child (<18) or Youth (15-18) Athlete Serious Injury, Disease and/or Death secondary to: ► Physical endangerment, maltreatment and/or abuse ► Psychological (Emotional) endangerment, maltreatment and/or abuse ► Sexual Abuse ► Failed child custodial protection ► Negligent care giving supervision ► Human rights violations ► That were inflicted, caused, created, or allowed to be inflicted, caused, created, directly or indirectly by the Problematic Coach, including the Strength Training, Conditioning and other specialty Coach, Problematic Parent or other Problematic Caretaker Person who has Child and Youth Athlete custodial protection, supervision, care and control during Sports, Recreation and Exercise Participation ► Failure to report the morbidity and mortality to Authorities is Illegal. [1.] [6.] ► In most United States, Children are minors when less than 18 years of age. ► The United Nations define Youth as persons between the ages of 15-24. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome and Cruelty to Children in Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE) are matters of importance to Doctors and Health Care Personnel. They summons all Doctors and Health Care Personnel into action for the Awareness and Prevention of these Child Athlete Preventable, Not-Accidental morbidities and mortalities. At any given time, one or another of the three adults might be blameful. All three are mandated reporters in most of the United States. This publication’s 3 main objectives are to: 1. Prevent Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome (CAAS) and Cruelty to Child and Youth Athletes, who participate in Sports, Recreation and Exercise (SRE) 2. Promote Athlete Safety 1st 3. Prevent Criminal and Civil Risks for “Problematic Coaches” who don’t know their legal relationship with Children who participate in SRE These objectives are to be accomplished by utilizing Education, Teaching, Scholarship, Research, Advocacy and Legislation. “Problematic caretakers” will continue maltreating and abusing athletes as long as they believe they can get away with it. Most individuals have a clear understanding of the meaning of violence. But the laws, policies and practices that are in place to protect children outside of sport are not always applied to organized SRE play. Within certain sports, there are a variety of definitions and situational circumstances that distort the meaning of the word, violence. “Violence in sport can be defined as behavior that causes harm, occurs outside of the rules of the sport and is unrelated to the competitive objectives of the activity.” [2.] That is the definition by sports concerns. Violence against children is universally defined and superior to sports. Let’s be clear from the beginning. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome and Cruelty to Children in SRE is medical doctor business. They summons all doctors for awareness, prevention and awareness of Child Athlete morbidity and mortality. If “problematic coaches and parents” are the culprits, their unlawful behaviors should trigger Forensic Medicine Investigations immediately following the incidents. Child is defined as a human less than the age of majority, usually 18 years in each United State. The United Nations define youth as persons between the ages of 15 and 24. UNESCO understands that young people are a heterogeneous group in constant evolution and that the experience of ‘being young’ varies enormously across regions and within countries.” Minor Youth would be age 15-18. [3.] When Child is used in this publication, minor youth are also implied. Coaches, Parents, Guardians and every Caretaker cross the line, when they cause, create or allow others to cause or create, directly or indirectly, circumstances that push and punish Child and Youth Athletes beyond their Physical and Emotional Limits and perpetrate Sexual Abuse. Doctors and Health Care Personnel cross the line when they cover-up or fail to document and Report Forensic Histories, Physical Examinations and Treatments for Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome. Doctors and Health Care Personnel risk Criminal Charges for Failure to Report Child Abuse and potential Civil Law Suits, when unreported Child Abuse escalates because it was not reported. All Reporters have immunity to HIPPA laws and anonymity from their identity disclosure. Child Athletes and Youth Athletes, less than 18, are Children first and Athletes second participating in SRE during every nanosecond. Child Athletes (<18) are defined and governed by their Age of Minority, not the activity in which they participate. “No Sport is a Kingdom unto its own,”…. “No one is above the Law.” said former Secretary of State and avid Sport Fan, Condeleezza Rice. [11.] The Code of Silence in Amateur Sports is nothing but a cover-up for bad Coaching behaviors and Child Athlete dangers. For example: The Case of the Penn State alleged cover-up will be tried later this year (2013) Every Child is covered by the Umbrella of Child Protection Law on every inch of ground, and every venue, during every nanosecond of time. That Umbrella is passed from Caretaker to Caretaker as Children pass from one venue to another. Children are never without the Umbrella of Child Protection Law, until they reach the age of adulthood, 18 in most United States. Child and Youth Athletes Do Not relinquish their Human Rights to the Coach, School, Athletic Association or anyone when they sign-up to participate in Sports, Recreation and Exercise. There are 2 different groups of Amateur Athletes under consideration i.e. Children and Adult Athletes. This report is about Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome, but most of the content it is applicable to Adult Athletes. All Coaches of Child Athletes, age less than 18, are Temporary Substitute Caretakers of Children, while the Children are in the Care, Custody and Control of the Coach during their participation in Sports, Recreation and Exercise. Child Abuse Statutes and other Legal Statutes in Adult Criminal Court are applicable, depending on the state court. In some states complex issues can be tried in both Family and Adult Criminal Courts simultaneously and it is not double jeopardy. For example in KY see KRS 620.120. However, children victims and withesses have Rights in Court. Children should not testify in public, photographed and videotaped court rooms for many reasons. Conversely, Adult (>18) Amateur Athletes in Sports Recreation and Exercise, College, Olympics and elsewhere enter into a Fiduciary Trust Standard of Care when they commit to play-for and provide-their-athletic-abilities in exchange for their Participation with Proper Care, Safety, Welfare and possibly Education. Legal Statutes in Adult Criminal Court are applicable.

Problematic Abusers will continue maltreating and abusing as long as they believe they can get away with it. Unfortunately the Will to Enforce the Law is the greatest Prevention and Deterrence of Child and Youth Athlete Abuse.

Prevent Child Athlete Cruelty and Abuse. Stop Coaches, Parents and Doctors from Crossing the Criminal and Civil Lines.

References:
1. Child Athlete Abuse Syndrome: Medical-Legal and Forensic Definition http://www.cappaa.com/child-athlete-abuse-syndrome-medical-legal-and-forensic-definition
2. Conversation with Paul Melia and Karri Dawson live, beyond the Cheers
3. UNESCO
4. Surgeon General’s Workshop on Making Prevention of Child Maltreatment a National Priority: Implementing Innovations of a Public Health Approach, Surgeon General’s Workshop Proceedings Lister Hill Auditorium, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland March 30–31, 2005
8. The Great Football Coach (Or Basketball Coach) research paper.
by Micheal B. Minix, Sr., M.D.
107. TRUE SPORT LIVES HERE – Anastasia, G. // George, D
119. WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION – Addressing the Issue of Verbal, Physical and Psychological Abuse of Athletes: The Foundation Position
_________________________________________________________________________
Child Saving History

“The child-saving movement had its roots in privately funded mid-nineteenth-century charitable organizations for the protection and benefit of children, such as the New York Children’s Aid Society.”

“At the movement’s height, between 1890 and 1920, child savers worked in such diverse reform efforts as fighting Child Abuse, regulating Child Labor, founding Kindergartens, building playgrounds, establishing the Juvenile Court, campaigning for mothers’ pensions, and reducing Infant Mortality rates.”

“The child-saving movement began in the latter half of the nineteenth century as a large, active coalition of women’s club members, philanthropists, and urban professionals.”

“In the United States, the child-saving movement grew in the Progressive Period as reformers responded to the problems associated with rapid industrialization and massive immigration. Child savers believed that by alleviating the perils of poverty for the young and working to Americanize the children of immigrants, they could secure a better future for their nation.”

“The progression of child saving is in many ways exemplified by efforts to combat child abuse and neglect. Starting in 1853, the New York Children’s Aid Society (CAS), headed by Charles Loring Brace, sought to save children of the urban poor by sending those who were orphaned, neglected, abused, or delinquent to live on farms with surrogate families in the West. A life with a farming family could redeem troubled youth.”

“In 1874, when a child named Mary Ellen was beaten by her guardian, the president of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Eldbridge Gerry, found that the only way to prosecute the abuser was under laws protecting the rights of animals.”

“The sensational case led to the foundation of the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (SPCC). CAS and SPCC were privately funded.”

“The period between 1910 and 1930 was marked by increased professionalization of social work, state regulation of child welfare, and a greater emphasis on child neglect, both physical and “moral,” rather than abuse.”

“Organizations to combat child abuse and neglect had an ambiguous attitude toward the family–they were at times child-centered, ready to intervene in private families in order to protect children, or to impose their notions of proper child rearing on immigrant and working-class families, and at times family-centered, anxious to keep families together even when the family patriarch was abusive.

“Child savers in Britain followed the American example, founding the Liverpool SPCC in 1883. Soon after, branches opened in London and other cities. Reluctant to prosecute parents, British SPCCs mainly relied on formal warnings and official visits to correct wayward parents. In 1889, the SPCC-supported Act for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children gave British authorities increased power to oversee the treatment of children.

Child savers undertook Child Labor and Compulsory Education and School Attendance Laws, Juvenile Delinquency in the late 1800 and early 1900. The first juvenile court was established in Chicago in 1899. “By 1915, nearly all states had established a juvenile court system.”

“Many child savers worked to organize the leisure time of children.”

“In the 1920s, a greater focus on psychiatry entered the juvenile courts and Child Guidance clinics changed the way the courts looked at young offenders.”

“The success of the Playground Movement was based in the acceptance of the idea that play was fundamentally important to the development of children and that the middle class should be involved in organizing the leisure time of the working class.”

”Between 1886 and 1896, the YMCA transformed itself into an athletic organization. It remained an explicitly evangelical Christian organization, but sought to gain young converts through organized sports.”

“In 1910, the Boy Scouts of America was founded. Baden-Powell hoped that scouting would help boys to be physically fit and mentally prepared to protect their nation and that scouting would help boys safely negotiate the dangerous years of Adolescence
.
Age of Consent

“In 1885, the issue of the sexual abuse of girls exploded into British consciousness with W. T. Stead’s “Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon”. The Pall Mall Gazette. published investigations and a story described the “purchase” of a thirteen-year-old virgin by a brothel. The Age of Consent for girls was raised from 13 to 16. Law enforcement gained to prosecute those involved in prostitution. The United States subsequently raised the age of consent of girls to protect girls from sexual abuse.

Public Health

“British and American child savers worried about public-health concerns that threatened children’s well-being. Poor sanitation, tuberculosis outbreaks, and tainted food and milk supplies were all targeted by reformers.”
British schools between 1906-1908 began programs to provide meals to elementary students and medical inspection of school children.

The U.S. Children’s Bureau was established in 1912 following the first Conference on the Care of Dependent Children in 1909. The Children’s Bureau first investigated the alarming infant mortality rate among impoverished city dwellers. The Bureau wrote popular instructional pamphlets and encouraged “baby saving” campaigns.

Between 1914 and 1920, the Bureau expanded and explored child labor, maternal and child health.

The Child Saving philosophy changed from reform to social-science research on normal children. Numerous child-research institutes were founded, and legislative reform efforts took a secondary role.

“Rather than focusing on environmental causes for children’s developmental problems, the new professional child savers focused on internal emotional conflicts to explain problems with adjustment.”

“The Progressives were most concerned with helping the so-called subnormal child, whereas the child savers of the later period focused their attention on understanding the so-called normal child.”

Title: Child Saving: An entry from Macmillan Reference USA’s Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood: In History and Society
Author: CAROLINE HINKLE MCAMANT
Publisher: Macmillan Reference USA
Media: Books
Format: Other
Language: English
Page Count: 3
ISBN-10: B001S58HI8
Release date: January 01, 2004

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Ashby, Leroy. 1997. Endangered Children: Dependency, Neglect, and Abuse in American History. New York: Twayne Publishers.
Behlmer, George K. 1982. Child Abuse and Moral Reform in England, 1870–1908. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Cavallo, Dominick. 1981. Muscles and Morals: Organized Playgrounds and Urban Reform, 1880–1920. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Cohen, Ronald D. 1985. “Child Saving and Progressivism, 1885–1915.” In American Childhood: A Research Guide and Historical Handbook, ed. Joseph M. Hawes and N. Ray Hiner. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
Cravens, Hamilton. 1985. “Child-Saving in the Age of Professionalism, 1915–1930.” In American Childhood: A Research Guide and Historical Handbook, ed. Joseph M. Hawes and N. Ray Hiner. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
Cremin, Lawrence A. 1961. The Transformation of the School: Progressivism in American Education, 1876–1957. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
Cunningham, Hugh. 1991. The Children of the Poor: Representations of Childhood Since the Seventeenth Century. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
Dwork, Deborah. 1987. War Is Good for Babies and Other Young Children: A History of the Infant and Child Welfare Movement in England, 1898–1918. London: Tavistock Publications.
Fass, Paula S. 1989. Outside In: Minorities and the Transformation of American Education. New York: Oxford University Press.
Gillis, John R. 1975. “The Evolution of Juvenile Delinquency in England, 1890–1914.” Past and Present 67: 96–126.
Gordon, Linda. 1988. Heroes of their Own Lives: The Politics and History of Family Violence, Boston 1880–1960. New York: Viking Penguin.
Hawes, Joseph M. 1971. Children in Urban Society: Juvenile Delinquency in Nineteenth-Century America. New York: Oxford University Press.
Lindenmeyer, Kriste. 1997. “A Right to Childhood”: The U.S. Children’s Bureau and Child Welfare, 1912–46. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
Macleod, David I. 1983. Building Character in the American Boy: The Boy Scouts, YMCA, and Their Forerunners, 1870–1920. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
Mason, Mary Ann. 1994. From Father’s Property to Children’s Rights: The History of Child Custody in the United States. New York: Columbia University Press.
Mennel, Robert M. 1973. Thorns and Thistles: Juvenile Delinquents in the United States, 1825–1940. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England.
Nardinelli, Clark. 1980. “Child Labor and the Factory Acts.” Journal of Economic History 40: 739–753.
Nasaw, David. 1985. Children of the City: At Work and at Play. Garden City, NY: Anchor Press/Doubleday.
Odem, Mary E. 1995. Delinquent Daughters: Protecting and Policing Adolescent Female Sexuality in the United States, 1885–1920. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.
Tiffin, Susan. 1982. In Whose Best Interest? Child Welfare Reform in the Progressive Era. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
Walkowitz, Judith R. 1992. City of Dreadful Delight: Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
[CAROLINE HINKLE MCAMANT, Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood in History and Society]

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