YOUTH BASKETBALL CONCUSSIONS

Girls Basketball ranked 4th and Boys Basketball ranked 7th among the leading causes of Concussion of 584 Sports Concussions in youth and adolescents reported by Athletic Trainers from Northeast Ohio high schools and colleges from July 31, 2014 to Jan 26, 2015. Football was ranked 1st. [1.]

The number of cases of basketball-related traumatic brain injury, which include concussions, head fractures and internal head injuries, has increased by 70 % among children ages 5 to 19 between 1997 and 2007 over the last decade, the researchers say.

Rough play should also be discouraged to minimize collisions. [2.]

“Now everybody looks like a sumo wrestler half the time,” North Carolina Coach Roy Williams said. “Guys are so big and so strong, the collisions are going to be bigger. If a Volkswagen hits a Volkswagen, it’s a big deal. But if a dump truck hits a dump truck, there’s more damage.” [3.]

Nowadays, diving for loose basketballs on the floor is extremely hazardous and unexpectedly litigable, when taught as a proper basketball technique wearing no protective equipment.

Like youth soccer, every sport should take “take the head out of the game” when purposely directed in a collision with any human or non-human object. [4.]

[1.] [American Academy of Pediatrics, National Conference and Exhibition, Oct 24-27, 2015, 584 Incident Reports, by Alan Rosenthal, MD1 et al, (1) Community Pediatrics, Cleveland Clinic, Independence, OH, (2) Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH]
[2.] [Basketball-related injuries in school-aged children and adolescents in 1997-2007. Randazzo C1, Nelson NG, McKenzie LB. Pediatrics. 2010 Oct;126(4):727-33. doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-2497. Epub 2010 Sep 13]
[3.] [As College Basketball Grows, Concussions Are a Side Effect, by AP, New York Times Mar 6, 2010]
[4.] Dr. Bob Cantu, co-founded the Sports Legacy Institute with Dr. Robert Cantu, a clinical professor of neurosurgery at Boston University School of Medicine, Medical Director National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Co-Director, Neurologic Sports Injury Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Chief of Neurosurgery Service, Chairman Department of Surgery, and Director of Sports Medicine at Emerson Hospital in Concord, Massachusetts, Neurosurgical Consultant Boston Eagles football team, and Neurosurgical Consultant Boston Cannons professional soccer team. Dr. Cantu also consults with numerous NFL, NHL and NBA teams.

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Characterization of Sport Concussion in Youths and Adolescents Using a Custom Mobile Incident Report Application, American Academy of Pediatrics. Results: From July 31, 2014 to January 26, 2015, 584 IR’s (Incident Report) were completed and uploaded documenting 584 unique concussive injuries.

• 53 injuries (9%) occurred in youths <14 years of age; 408 (70%) occurred in adolescents 14-18 years of age, and 93 (21%) occurred in young adults >18 years of age.
• 307 injuries (52.5%) occurred in a game situation, 211 (36%) in a practice situation, and 66 (11.5%) occurred in other venues.
• The eight most common sports in which injuries occurred included
1. football (51.2%),
2. girls’ soccer (13.8%),
3. boys’ soccer (8.3%),
4. girls’ basketball (6.7%),
5. boys’ wrestling (5.3%),
6. girls’ volleyball (4.5%),
7. boys’ basketball (4.1%),
8. and boys’ ice hockey (3.4%).
• 324 (55.5%) injuries occurred as a result of collision with another player,
• 120 (20.5%) involved contact with playing surface, 1
• 26 (21.6%) involved contact with an implement (ie: ball, puck, goal post),
• while mechanism was unreported in 13 (2%).
• Athlete disposition (Figure 1) demonstrated that of the 132 athletes who continued to play after their injury, 107 did not report their symptoms to medical personnel or coaching staff, and 25 experienced delayed onset of symptoms.
[Characterization of Sport Concussion in Youths and Adolescents Using a Custom Mobile Incident Report Application by Alan Rosenthal, MD1, Susan M Linder, DPT, NCS2, Richard So, M.D.1, Tanujit Dey, PhD2, Daniel Burke, BS2, Jason Cruickshank, BS, MA2, Andrew Russman, DO2 and Jay L Alberts, PhD2, (1)Community Pediatrics, Cleveland Clinic, Independence, OH, (2)Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, American Academy of Pediatrics, National Conference and Exhibition, Oct 24-27, 2015 Walter E. Washington Convention Center]
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An increasing number of children are admitted to hospital emergency departments for traumatic brain injuries sustained while playing basketball, the most popular team sport for kids, a new study suggests.

The number of cases of basketball-related traumatic brain injury, which include concussions, head fractures and internal head injuries, has increased by 70 percent among children over the last decade, the researchers say.

The increase occurred despite a 22 percent decline in the total number of basketball-related injuries over the same time period.

Factors such as the increased intensity and competitiveness of the game, along with the fact that children are starting to play at younger ages, might also have contributed to the rise.

Traumatic brain injury can have long-term impacts on young athletes. It can affect their heath, their memory, their learning and their survival,” said study author Lara McKenzie, principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

They examined cases of basketball-related injuries in children ages 5 to 19 between 1997 and 2007.

Traumatic brain injury cases increased from 7,030 in 1997 to 11,948 in 2007. However, traumatic brain injuries might be underestimated because studies have shown that around a third of athletes don’t recognize concussion symptoms , or continue to play after they experience dizziness, the researchers said. And basketball related injuries as a whole might be underestimated, since the researchers only considered injuries treated at emergency departments, not other care centers.

Rough play should also be discouraged to minimize collisions, McKenzie said.

[Basketball-related injuries in school-aged children and adolescents in 1997-2007. Randazzo C1, Nelson NG, McKenzie LB. Pediatrics. 2010 Oct;126(4):727-33. doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-2497. Epub 2010 Sep 13]

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“Guys are so big and so strong, the collisions are going to be bigger. If a Volkswagen hits a Volkswagen, it’s a big deal. But if a dump truck hits a dump truck, there’s more damage.”

A study of all divisions of NCAA sports by the National Athletic Trainers Association showed head and facial injuries in basketball increased by an annual average of 6.2 percent from 1988-2004. Concussions represented 3.6 percent of all injuries reported. Women basketball players were three times more likely to get a concussion than men.

The number of Division I players 6-foot-9 or taller increased from 649 in the 2000-01 season to 681 in 2008-09, according to STATS Inc., and they tend to be a bit more filled out than before.

The days of the frail, pipe-cleaner thin freshmen are almost over.

We’re building these players bigger, stronger, faster,” Guskiewicz said. “When you look at the physics involved — force equals mass times acceleration — you take a bigger person and they’re moving down the court more quickly and there’s a collision, the resultant forces that are applied to the head and ultimately the brain, sure, there’s going to be more concussions.”

[College basketball concussion rate higher than any sport Interns, The Daily Caller]
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In 2010, a study in Pediatrics showed that 375,000 youths are sent to the emergency room each year due to basketball-related injuries. Although the total number of injuries declined over a 10-year period, the report highlighted a 70 percent increase in traumatic brain injuries on the court. Just this past December,a Seton Hall college basketball player was hospitalized for a few days when he was fouled and came down on the left side of his head.
[MICHELLE CASTILLO CBS NEWS March 20, 2014 Basketball and the brain: Concussions aren’t just a risk in football]

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Giraffes prefer feeding on high trees and plants, because of their size, eyesight and powerful kicks (that keep short predators away). When they bend down to eat or drink they fall prey to lions and other predators low on the ground, who can attack their head and neck and bring them down.

And so it should be with tall basketball players, who earn their keep around the rim. Diving on the floor for loose balls is dangerous for every basketball athlete. Diving is even more dangerous for tall basketball players, who are not as adept with low places. “Putting your head in the game” is extremely dangerous and can result in disabling, life threatening, concussions and neck injuries.

In addition, it is moronic coaching, reporting and cheering. If a player sustains a “diving on the floor” severe head or neck injury, when taught improperly to dive by a coach, without protective headgear, both the school and coach are at risk, when a concussion expert is called to testify, who understands the new concept, “keep the head out of the game”. Like heading in youth soccer, soon diving for loose basketball in games and practice will be eliminated, because a pound of morbidity and mortality prevention is better than and ounce of “showtime” for the crowd and media.

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